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. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . atre.* This occurred a.d. 404. It was not howeveruntil the year 500 that the practice was finally and com-pletely abolished by Theodoric. Some time before the day appointed for the spectacle, hewho gave it (editor) published bills containing the name andensigns of the gladiators, for each of them had his own distinc-tive badge, and stating also how many were to fight, and howlong the show would

. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . atre.* This occurred a.d. 404. It was not howeveruntil the year 500 that the practice was finally and com-pletely abolished by Theodoric. Some time before the day appointed for the spectacle, hewho gave it (editor) published bills containing the name andensigns of the gladiators, for each of them had his own distinc-tive badge, and stating also how many were to fight, and howlong the show would Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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2CE4WP7

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7.1 MB (592.9 KB Compressed download)

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1169 x 2137 px | 19.8 x 36.2 cm | 7.8 x 14.2 inches | 150dpi

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. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . atre.* This occurred a.d. 404. It was not howeveruntil the year 500 that the practice was finally and com-pletely abolished by Theodoric. Some time before the day appointed for the spectacle, hewho gave it (editor) published bills containing the name andensigns of the gladiators, for each of them had his own distinc-tive badge, and stating also how many were to fight, and howlong the show would last. It appep, rs, that like our itinerantshowmen, they sometimes exhibited paintings of what thesports were to contain. On the appointed day the gladiatorsmarched in procession with much ceremony into the amphi-theatre. They then separated into pairs, as they had beenpreviously matched. The annexed engraving, taken from apicture on the wall of the amphitheatre at Pompeii, seems torepresent the beginning of a combat. In the middle standsthe arbiter of the fight, marking out with a long stick the»pace for the combatants. On his right stands a gladiator * Gibbon, chap. xxx. THE AMPHITHEATRE. 227. 228 POMPEH. only half armed, to wliom two others are bringing a swordand helmet. On the left another gladiator, also only partlyarmed, sounds the trumpet for the commencement of thefight; whilst behind him two companions, at the foot of oneof the Victories which enclose the scene, are preparing hishelmet and shield. At first, however, they contended onlywith staves, called rudes, or with blunted weapons ; but whenwarmed and inspirited by the pretence of battle, they changedtheir weapons, and advanced at the sound of trumpets to thereal strife. The conquered looked to the people or to theemperor for life; his antagonist had no power to grant or torefuse it; but if the spectators were dissatisfied and gave thesignal of death, he was obliged to become the executioner oftheir will. This sig

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