Pompeii, its history, buildings, and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations, and also an itinerary for visitors . at least, welearn from Vitruvius, was the general practice; and this gal-lery was usually appropriated to the use of those who had themanagement of the public revenue. The area of the Forum was. adorned with pedestals, for thestatues of those who merited or could procure this distinction.Some are of the proportion adapted to equestrian statues.They were- all coated with white marble, ornamented w

Pompeii, its history, buildings, and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations, and also an itinerary for visitors . at least, welearn from Vitruvius, was the general practice; and this gal-lery was usually appropriated to the use of those who had themanagement of the public revenue. The area of the Forum was. adorned with pedestals, for thestatues of those who merited or could procure this distinction.Some are of the proportion adapted to equestrian statues.They were- all coated with white marble, ornamented w Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AN41M8

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7.1 MB (645.4 KB Compressed download)

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1324 x 1887 px | 22.4 x 32 cm | 8.8 x 12.6 inches | 150dpi

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Pompeii, its history, buildings, and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations, and also an itinerary for visitors . at least, welearn from Vitruvius, was the general practice; and this gal-lery was usually appropriated to the use of those who had themanagement of the public revenue. The area of the Forum was. adorned with pedestals, for thestatues of those who merited or could procure this distinction.Some are of the proportion adapted to equestrian statues.They were- all coated with white marble, ornamented witha Doric frieze; and appear to have been still in process ofercction, f to rojdacc an older set of pedestals, at the time * In the holes at c the joists of the floor of the upper gallery were mostprobably fixed. t It is more probable that the marble was subsequently stripped off them.Five pedestals still retain their marble in whole or in part. DESCRIPTION OF TEMPLES. 133 when Pompeii was destroyed. Some are inscribed withnames, and on one of them may be read that of Pansa. Atthe south end is a small isolated arch, on which possibly thetutelary genius of the city might have been placed. Such. was the construction of a Roman forum : the reader will notbe at a loss to appreciate its combined utility and magnifi-cence. Some surprise may be felt at the expense lavished soprodigally on public buildings in an inconsiderable town. 134 POMPEII. But the Boinans lived in public, and depended on the publicfor their amusements and pleasure. A Eoman citizen, says M. Simond, went out early, and did not return homeuntil the evening repast; he spent his day in the forum, atthe baths, at the theatre—everywhere, in short, except at hisown home, where he slept in a small room, without windows, without a chimney, and almost without furniture. Archi-tectural splendour therefore, both in places of public businessand of public pleasure, was far more studied and of far greaterimportance than it now i

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