. Elementary lectures on veterinary science, for agricultural students, farmers, and stockkeepers ... placed close to the cornerincisors, there being no interval between canine and incisors as isthe case in the horse. The tongue, too, is of a different shape, beingshort and pointed, and instead of having a smooth surface, it isextremely roughened by little papillae. It is also the prehensileagent. The soft palate, though present, is much less developed thanin the horse. When we come to the stomach, however, we encounterwide differences. Cattle and sheep have four stomachs, or, to bemore precis

. Elementary lectures on veterinary science, for agricultural students, farmers, and stockkeepers ... placed close to the cornerincisors, there being no interval between canine and incisors as isthe case in the horse. The tongue, too, is of a different shape, beingshort and pointed, and instead of having a smooth surface, it isextremely roughened by little papillae. It is also the prehensileagent. The soft palate, though present, is much less developed thanin the horse. When we come to the stomach, however, we encounterwide differences. Cattle and sheep have four stomachs, or, to bemore precis Stock Photo
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. Elementary lectures on veterinary science, for agricultural students, farmers, and stockkeepers ... placed close to the cornerincisors, there being no interval between canine and incisors as isthe case in the horse. The tongue, too, is of a different shape, beingshort and pointed, and instead of having a smooth surface, it isextremely roughened by little papillae. It is also the prehensileagent. The soft palate, though present, is much less developed thanin the horse. When we come to the stomach, however, we encounterwide differences. Cattle and sheep have four stomachs, or, to bemore precise, a stomach divided into four compartments. The first is the rumen, or paunch (Plate XXIII., Nos. I. and Il.yA A A A). The second is the reticulum, or honeycomb (Plate XXIII., C C). The third is the omasum, or manyplies (Plate XXIII., D D). The fourth is the ahoinasum, or True Digestive Stomach {PlateXXIII., E E). The first, second, and third stomachs are compartments for storingand preparing the food—more particularly the cellulose portions ofit—for digestion by the fourth. 182 PLATE XXIII. ?. Internal Appearance of Cows Stomach, EXPLANATION OF PLATE XXIII I. External Appearance of Cows Stomach. A A A A. First Stomach, Rumen or Paunch. B. CEsophagus or Gullet. C. Second Stomach, Reticulum or Honeycomb. D. Third Stomach. Omasum or Manyplies. E. Fourth, True Stomach, or Abomasum. F. Pyloric Portion of Fourth Stomach. 2. Internal Appearance of Cows Stomach. AAA. First Stomach, Rumen or Paunch, showing Pouches, Muscular Bands, and Papillae. B. CEsophagus or Gullet laid open. C. Second Stomach, Reticulum, everted to show the honeycombed cell appearance. D. Third Stomach, showing the Leaves. E. Fourth Stomach, with its numerous folds. F. CEsophageal Canal leading to Fourth Stomach. G. CEsophageal Canal entering the Fourth Stomach.H. Small Intestine. t86 veterinary LECTURES 287. The First Stomach, the Rumen {Plate XXIIL, A A A A), which is the largest of the four stomachs, and lie