Titian's Bacchus and Ariadne

- Image ID: B3W365
Titian's Bacchus and Ariadne
Ivy Close Images / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: B3W365
The master Venetian painter Titian (1477-1576) developed a sumptuous, coloristic style in the grand manner characteristic of the High Renaissance. This painting, oil on canvas, measures 5' 9' high by 6' 3" wide. It was painted between 1520 and 1523 and hangs in London's National Gallery. The title is "Bacchus and Ariadne." According to Greek mythology, Ariadne, the daughter of Minos, king of Crete, was deserted by the Greek hero Theseus (the white sails of his departing ship seen in the distance). Here, she is surprised by the god of wine and merriment, Bacchus, and his followers (nymphs, fauns, satyrs), who are returning from a sacrifice. Smitten with love for Ariadne, Bacchus leaps from his chariot to go to her. Above Ariadne is the constellation of Ariadne's crown, which Bacchus gave her as a present on their wedding.