zReportage.com Story of the Week # 521 - Innocence Lost - Launched April 8, 2014 - Full multimedia experience: audio, stills, text and or video: Go to zReportage.com to see more - According to the Labour Laws of Bangladesh, the minimum legal age for employment is 14. However, as 93 per cent of child laborers work in small factories and workshops, and on the street - the enforcement of labour laws is virtually impossible. Poverty causes families to send children to work, often in hazardous and low-wage jobs, such as brick-chipping, construction and refuse collecting. Children are paid less than

- Image ID: DY5HTF
ZUMA Press, Inc. / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: DY5HTF
zReportage.com Story of the Week # 521 - Innocence Lost - Launched April 8, 2014 - Full multimedia experience: audio, stills, text and or video: Go to zReportage.com to see more - According to the Labour Laws of Bangladesh, the minimum legal age for employment is 14. However, as 93 per cent of child laborers work in small factories and workshops, and on the street - the enforcement of labour laws is virtually impossible. Poverty causes families to send children to work, often in hazardous and low-wage jobs, such as brick-chipping, construction and refuse collecting. Children are paid less than adults, with many working up to twelve hours a day. Full-time work frequently prevents children from attending school. Long hours, low or no wages, poor food, isolation and hazards in the working environment can severely affect children's physical and mental health. UNICEF estimates that around 150 million children aged 5-14 in developing countries are involved in child labour. Although numbers suggest that more boys than girls are involved in child labour, many of the types of work girls are involved in are invisible. It is estimated that roughly 90 per cent of children involved in domestic labour are girls. World Day Against Child Labour is June 12. (Credit Image: © Probal Rashid/NurPhoto/zReportage.com via ZUMA Press)

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