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Xavier Vallat, Vichy French Commissioner-General for Jewish Questions, France, April, 1941. Vallat was appointed head of the Commissariat-General for Jewish Questions, the body responsible for implementing the Vichy regime's anti-semitic laws, in March 1941. Vichy France co-operated enthusiastically with the Nazis plans for the extermination of the Jews. Some 76,000 French Jews were rounded up and sent to concentration camps between 1942 and 1944, with only 2500 surviving. Vallat was dismissed as Commissioner-General in May 1942 for his criticism of the refusal of the Nazis to release France's

Xavier Vallat, Vichy French Commissioner-General for Jewish Questions, France, April, 1941. Vallat was appointed head of the Commissariat-General for Jewish Questions, the body responsible for implementing the Vichy regime's anti-semitic laws, in March 1941. Vichy France co-operated enthusiastically with the Nazis plans for the extermination of the Jews. Some 76,000 French Jews were rounded up and sent to concentration camps between 1942 and 1944, with only 2500 surviving. Vallat was dismissed as Commissioner-General in May 1942 for his criticism of the refusal of the Nazis to release France's Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

World History Archive / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CWBDG9

File size:

60 MB (1.1 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

5339 x 3928 px | 45.2 x 33.3 cm | 17.8 x 13.1 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

30 June 2020

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Xavier Vallat, Vichy French Commissioner-General for Jewish Questions, France, April, 1941. Vallat was appointed head of the Commissariat-General for Jewish Questions, the body responsible for implementing the Vichy regime's anti-semitic laws, in March 1941. Vichy France co-operated enthusiastically with the Nazis plans for the extermination of the Jews. Some 76,000 French Jews were rounded up and sent to concentration camps between 1942 and 1944, with only 2500 surviving. Vallat was dismissed as Commissioner-General in May 1942 for his criticism of the refusal of the Nazis to release France's prisoners of war. He remained a supporter of the Vichy government however, and regularly made anti-semitic broadcasts on Vichy radio. After the war he was sentenced to ten years imprisonment for his part in the persecution of France's Jews. The leniency of the sentence took into account Vallat's service in the First World War, in which he lost his left leg and eye. The photographer is unknown.