www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book... . Harbour and ruins of Cnidus. of Apollo and Poseidon. The great navaldefeat of Pisander by Conon (b.c. 394) tookplace off Cnidus. Pliny mentions it as a freecity (v. 104). Among the celebrated nativesof the city were Ctesias, Eudoxus, Sostratus,and Agatharchides. It is said to have beenalso called, at an early period, Triopia, fromits founder Triopas, and, in later times,Stadia. (Strab. p. 656; Paus. v. 24, 7, viii.30, x. 11.) Cnosus or Gnosus, subsequently Cnossus orGnossus (Kvaicos, Tvwaos, Kvoxrcrds, Tvutrcros :Kvdxrios, Kvuaffio

www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book... . Harbour and ruins of Cnidus. of Apollo and Poseidon. The great navaldefeat of Pisander by Conon (b.c. 394) tookplace off Cnidus. Pliny mentions it as a freecity (v. 104). Among the celebrated nativesof the city were Ctesias, Eudoxus, Sostratus,and Agatharchides. It is said to have beenalso called, at an early period, Triopia, fromits founder Triopas, and, in later times,Stadia. (Strab. p. 656; Paus. v. 24, 7, viii.30, x. 11.) Cnosus or Gnosus, subsequently Cnossus orGnossus (Kvaicos, Tvwaos, Kvoxrcrds, Tvutrcros :Kvdxrios, Kvuaffio Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJJDCH

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7.1 MB (294.9 KB Compressed download)

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2342 x 1067 px | 39.7 x 18.1 cm | 15.6 x 7.1 inches | 150dpi

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www.flickr.com/photos/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book... . Harbour and ruins of Cnidus. of Apollo and Poseidon. The great navaldefeat of Pisander by Conon (b.c. 394) tookplace off Cnidus. Pliny mentions it as a freecity (v. 104). Among the celebrated nativesof the city were Ctesias, Eudoxus, Sostratus, and Agatharchides. It is said to have beenalso called, at an early period, Triopia, fromits founder Triopas, and, in later times, Stadia. (Strab. p. 656; Paus. v. 24, 7, viii.30, x. 11.) Cnosus or Gnosus, subsequently Cnossus orGnossus (Kvaicos, Tvwaos, Kvoxrcrds, Tvutrcros :Kvdxrios, Kvuaffios: Makro Teikho), an an-cient town of Crete, and the capital of kingMinos, was situated in a fertile country on theriver Caeratus (which was originally the nameof the town), at a short distance from theN. coast. It was at an early time colonised. Coin of Cnosus. Obv., Head of Hera with wreath of flowers; rev., laby-rinth, spear-head and thunderbolt (for Zeus). Coin of4th cent. B.C. by Dorians, and from it Dorian institutionsspread over the island. Its power was weak-ened by the growing importance of Gortynand Cydonia; and these towns, when united, were more than a match for Cnosus.—Cnosus / COBUS is frequently mentioned by the poets in conse-quence of its connexion with Minos, Ariadne, the Minotaur, and the Labyrinth; and theadjective Cnosius, Cnossius, or Gnossius is fre-quently used as equivalent to Cretan. Themarriage of Zeus with Hera was celebrated asan annual festival, and Hera appears on thecoins as a bride. {Oil. xix. ITS; Strab. p. 477;Polyb. iv. 53 : Diod. i. 61.I Cobus or Cohibus iKuPos), a river of Asia, flowing from the Caucasus into the E. side ofthe Euxine. Cocalus (Kiokoos), king of Sicily, receivedDaedalus on his flight from Crete, and withthe help of his daughters put Minos to death, when the latter came in pu

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