An employee of Indonesian oil company Pertamina walks on the top of drums at the oil storage depot in Jakarta September 1, 2005. Indonesia's state oil company Pertamina increased prices of high octane gasoline by more than 40 percent and hiked the prices of some other industry fuels on Thursday to catch up with the rising cost of crude oil. REUTERS/Beawiharta  BEA/PN
RM2CP0K2EAn employee of Indonesian oil company Pertamina walks on the top of drums at the oil storage depot in Jakarta September 1, 2005. Indonesia's state oil company Pertamina increased prices of high octane gasoline by more than 40 percent and hiked the prices of some other industry fuels on Thursday to catch up with the rising cost of crude oil. REUTERS/Beawiharta BEA/PN
A worker walks up the stairs of an oil storage tank at Germany's Esso fuel and oil storage facility in Ingolstadt.  A worker walks up the stairs of an oil storage tank at Germany's Esso fuel and oil storage facility in Ingolstadt, about 70 kilometers north of Munich, August 9, 2004. U.S. oil prices slipped for the second straight session on Monday, but remained not far off $44 a barrel on lingering worries that there was little spare production capacity in the world to cover any supply hiccup. REUTERS/Alexandra Winkler
RM2CNXYW8A worker walks up the stairs of an oil storage tank at Germany's Esso fuel and oil storage facility in Ingolstadt. A worker walks up the stairs of an oil storage tank at Germany's Esso fuel and oil storage facility in Ingolstadt, about 70 kilometers north of Munich, August 9, 2004. U.S. oil prices slipped for the second straight session on Monday, but remained not far off $44 a barrel on lingering worries that there was little spare production capacity in the world to cover any supply hiccup. REUTERS/Alexandra Winkler
A worker walks up the stairs to an oil storage tank at a fuel and oil storage facility in Berlin August 4, 2004. U.S. oil prices [struck a fresh record high above $44 a barrel August 4, 2004, on continuing concerns that any hiccup in the tightly stretched supply chain could lead to a major disruption in global crude flows. U.S. crude struck $44.28 a barrel, 13 cents up from Tuesday's settlement and the highest since oil futures were launched on the New York Mercantile Exchange in 1983.]
RM2D41H8YA worker walks up the stairs to an oil storage tank at a fuel and oil storage facility in Berlin August 4, 2004. U.S. oil prices [struck a fresh record high above $44 a barrel August 4, 2004, on continuing concerns that any hiccup in the tightly stretched supply chain could lead to a major disruption in global crude flows. U.S. crude struck $44.28 a barrel, 13 cents up from Tuesday's settlement and the highest since oil futures were launched on the New York Mercantile Exchange in 1983.]