Words: Dean Murray Pictures: Euan Cherry/Cover Images A charity for young amputee footballers are asking Scotland to get behind them. Amputee Football Scotland needs vital funds to help three sports-mad children represent their country in Germany. The inspiring youngsters are hoping to take part in July's European Amputee Football Junior Camp '19. Keeley Cerretti, 10, from Larkhall, Daniel McDevitt, 10, from Stranraer and Harris Tinney, 11, from Glasgow, all play for Partick Thistle Amputees. They hope to join up to 100 other young amputees from countries all across Europe over four days

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WENN Rights Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RPP24T
Words: Dean Murray Pictures: Euan Cherry/Cover Images A charity for young amputee footballers are asking Scotland to get behind them. Amputee Football Scotland needs vital funds to help three sports-mad children represent their country in Germany. The inspiring youngsters are hoping to take part in July's European Amputee Football Junior Camp '19. Keeley Cerretti, 10, from Larkhall, Daniel McDevitt, 10, from Stranraer and Harris Tinney, 11, from Glasgow, all play for Partick Thistle Amputees. They hope to join up to 100 other young amputees from countries all across Europe over four days playing football. A crowdfunding page has been set-up to raise the £1,000 required: https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/amputeefootballjuniors-euro19trip But rather than pitting nations against each other, Ashley Reid, CEO and founder of Amputee Football Association Scotland, says the goal is "meeting new friends and improving their health and fitness." Amputee Football Association Scotland (AFAS) is a Scottish charity set up in April 2017 by single working mother Ashley, and Paul Kelly, manager of Partick Thistle Community Trust. Amputee football is established in England and the rest of Europe, with competitive leagues and regular tournaments, however, until AFAS, nothing had existed in Scotland to facilitate the sport. Since its inception, AFAS has established amputee football teams at Partick Thistle in Glasgow and at Dundee United. Fortnightly junior and senior training sessions are held at the respective clubs. Keeley had her lower leg amputated following an infection in her bowel shortly after birth. Her mother Jan, 52, explains: "Keeley, who is a twin, was born eight weeks early, weighing only 2lbs 12 ounces. She was fine for two weeks then got really sick. She ended up having a lifesaving op that meant they had to take away a third of her gut. "During the op, they punctured her femoral artery, which led to a loss of blood in her leg. She was back in theatre the next

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