Winston Churchill's 1939 Daimler DB18 Drophead Coupe by Carlton, in the Paddock area of the 2018 London Classic Car Show

- Image ID: MN8WKM
Winston Churchill's 1939 Daimler DB18 Drophead Coupe by Carlton, in the Paddock area of the 2018 London Classic Car Show
John Gaffen / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: MN8WKM
The Daimler DB18 is an automobile which was produced by Daimler from 1939 to 1953. It is a 2½-litre version of the preceding 2.2-litre New Fifteen introduced in 1937. From 1949, the DB18 was revised to become the Daimler Consort. Using the engine developed for the Daimler Scout Car, it was offered to customers from 1939 as a six-cylinder chassis on which Daimler and various British coach builders offered a range of bodies including drop-head coupes. The model was introduced immediately before the start of the World War II, during which the company was compelled to concentrated on the manufacture of military vehicles. Therefore, most DB18s were produced after 1945. To contemporaries the model was generally known as the Daimler 2½-litre until Daimler adopted the North American habit of giving their cars names (although not on any badgework), and a slightly updated version of the car was introduced in October 1948 at the London Motor Show, "principally for export" and branded as the Daimler Consort. The updates included the integration of the firewall into the body rather than it being part of the chassis, a move from rod operated mechanical brakes to a Girling-Bendix hydraulic front and rod operated rear system, incorporating the head lights into the front guards, and providing a badge plate behind the front bumper with a curved radiator grille replacing the flat one. In 1939, Winston Churchill commissioned Carlton Carriage Co to build a drophead coupe on a DB18 chassis, chassis No.49531. Never used until post-World War II, he used it during election campaigns in the later 1940s
Location: ExCel, London, UK