Window gardening : devoted specially to the culture of flowers and ornamental plants for indoor use and parlor decoration . WINDOW GARDENING. 108 or more inches, according to the size you desire. They must be about an inchin diameter, and a hole should be bored with a gimblet an inch from the end ofeach stick. They are put together in log-house fashion, one stick lopping overthe other, and a wire with a loop on the upper end is passed through the holesat each corner, and bent up on the under side. A piece of board an inch thickis then fastened to the sides for a bottom, and the spaces between

Window gardening : devoted specially to the culture of flowers and ornamental plants for indoor use and parlor decoration . WINDOW GARDENING. 108 or more inches, according to the size you desire. They must be about an inchin diameter, and a hole should be bored with a gimblet an inch from the end ofeach stick. They are put together in log-house fashion, one stick lopping overthe other, and a wire with a loop on the upper end is passed through the holesat each corner, and bent up on the under side. A piece of board an inch thickis then fastened to the sides for a bottom, and the spaces between Stock Photo
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Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AM458P

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7.1 MB (370.2 KB Compressed download)

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1886 x 1325 px | 31.9 x 22.4 cm | 12.6 x 8.8 inches | 150dpi

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Window gardening : devoted specially to the culture of flowers and ornamental plants for indoor use and parlor decoration . WINDOW GARDENING. 108 or more inches, according to the size you desire. They must be about an inchin diameter, and a hole should be bored with a gimblet an inch from the end ofeach stick. They are put together in log-house fashion, one stick lopping overthe other, and a wire with a loop on the upper end is passed through the holesat each corner, and bent up on the under side. A piece of board an inch thickis then fastened to the sides for a bottom, and the spaces between the stick.!should be filled up with moss. Small iron chains suspend such baskets, andrich soil from the woods is the best to grow the plants that will twine roundthe chains and wreath them. Ribbons can be used if desired. We have seenmore than fifty of these baskets suspended from the roof of an orchid-house, and the effect was exquisitely beautiful. A cocoanut affords a very pretty miniature basket. Leave the husk on, and. Fig. 13. saw off about one-quarter of the nut; dig out the meat, and bore holes throughthree sides of it. The stem end is the part to be sawed off. Tie cords into theholes. There are many articles lying about every house that could do duty forhanging baskets. Worn out fly-covers can be lined with moss or cartridge paper, and when filled with soil and beautiful plants they produce as fine an effect asmany a more picturesque affair. We saw one but recently covered with-the golden flowers of the Moneywort, mingled with the bright blue of theLobelia, and the Zebra-striped leaves of the Tradescantia, all growing luxuri-antly, and making a humble cottage window a picture of grace and beauty. Ox muzzles are within the reach of every country girl, and when paintedgreen and lined with moss they form most desirable baskets to suspend frompiazzas or trees. They will hang from the trees all winter, and in the spring th ]()4 WINDOW GARDENING. hardy vines, Moneywort and Par

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