. Wild Spain (Espan?a agreste): records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun; natural history and exploration. Natural history; Hunting; Game and game-birds. THE LITTLE BUSTARD. 845 remain hard by, ever constant to their sitting partners, and not "packing" or deserting them, as is the wont of their less faithful cousins, Otis tarda. Not till the young are on the whig are the Sisones seen again in packs. This marked difference of habit between congeneric species so closely allied as the two Bustards is very curious. Possessed of keen powers of eye and ear, combined with the strongest ide

. Wild Spain (Espan?a agreste): records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun; natural history and exploration. Natural history; Hunting; Game and game-birds. THE LITTLE BUSTARD. 845 remain hard by, ever constant to their sitting partners, and not "packing" or deserting them, as is the wont of their less faithful cousins, Otis tarda. Not till the young are on the whig are the Sisones seen again in packs. This marked difference of habit between congeneric species so closely allied as the two Bustards is very curious. Possessed of keen powers of eye and ear, combined with the strongest ide Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RDN841

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7.1 MB (398.1 KB Compressed download)

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1938 x 1289 px | 32.8 x 21.8 cm | 12.9 x 8.6 inches | 150dpi

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. Wild Spain (Espan?a agreste): records of sport with rifle, rod, and gun; natural history and exploration. Natural history; Hunting; Game and game-birds. THE LITTLE BUSTARD. 845 remain hard by, ever constant to their sitting partners, and not "packing" or deserting them, as is the wont of their less faithful cousins, Otis tarda. Not till the young are on the whig are the Sisones seen again in packs. This marked difference of habit between congeneric species so closely allied as the two Bustards is very curious. Possessed of keen powers of eye and ear, combined with the strongest ideas of self-preservation all round, the Little Bustard is never—in a sporting season— surprised in covert. His favourite haunts are in rough country, where he has every opportunity of remaining. LITTLE BUSTABDS—MAY. concealed himself, while yet able to survey all that passes for a wide radius around. Barely does one descry a band of these birds on the ground. The loud rattle of wings as a pack springs 200 yards away is usually the first inti- mation of their presence. If, by some lucky chance, they are seen on the ground, even then the tactics employed to secure the larger bustard, namely, by ambushing the guns in a half-circle on their front, and driving the birds towards them, seldom, very seldom, come off. The Uisones almost invariably take flight, from some un-. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Chapman, Abel, 1851-1929; Buck, Walter John. London, Gurney and Jackson

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