Alamy logo

Washburn & Co.'s amateur cultivator's guide to the flower and kitchen garden : containing a descriptive list of two thousand varieties of flower and vegetable seeds : also a list of French hybrid gladiolus, . nnials, is alight, rich loam, neither too sandy nor too stiff. In such they grow readily, and attain to great per-fection of bloom, with but little care; but it is hardly necessary to say that few persons have justsuch a soil, nor is it possible often for the cultivator to have much choice. He must take such soil ashe has, and make the most of it; and, by the application of proper manures

Washburn & Co.'s amateur cultivator's guide to the flower and kitchen garden : containing a descriptive list of two thousand varieties of flower and vegetable seeds : also a list of French hybrid gladiolus, . nnials, is alight, rich loam, neither too sandy nor too stiff. In such they grow readily, and attain to great per-fection of bloom, with but little care; but it is hardly necessary to say that few persons have justsuch a soil, nor is it possible often for the cultivator to have much choice. He must take such soil ashe has, and make the most of it; and, by the application of proper manures Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AJEXPR

File size:

7.1 MB (302.7 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1165 x 2144 px | 19.7 x 36.3 cm | 7.8 x 14.3 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Washburn & Co.'s amateur cultivator's guide to the flower and kitchen garden : containing a descriptive list of two thousand varieties of flower and vegetable seeds : also a list of French hybrid gladiolus, . nnials, is alight, rich loam, neither too sandy nor too stiff. In such they grow readily, and attain to great per-fection of bloom, with but little care; but it is hardly necessary to say that few persons have justsuch a soil, nor is it possible often for the cultivator to have much choice. He must take such soil ashe has, and make the most of it; and, by the application of proper manures, or sand or clay, he canbring it to such a condition as to answer all the purposes of a flower-garden. Moving largemasses of soil is very expensive ; and writers who advise the addition of rich loam seem not to beaware of the difficulty of procuring it, or the expense and labor attending the same. For the com-plete garden of the wealthy, this may and should be done ; but the mass of cultivators need not fearof obtaining good results without it. Deep and thorough trenching in the autumn, if possible, andthe application of very old decayed manure or leaf-mould, will give the amateur a well-prepared and. 3 I—4 THE SUMMER FLOWER-GARDEN. suitable soil. If the situation of the garden is low or damp, first of all, it should be well drained ; for,in addition to the injury from excessive moisture, such soils are cold, and the young plants are in-jured by early frosts, when they would escape damage in one of the opposite character: neithershould the situation be too dry, as, in this case, the plants would suffer in summer, and present ameagre in place of a vigorous bloom. Where the soil is too light, a thin layer of clay, if to be had,spread over the surface in the autumn, and dug in, after being pulverized by the winter frosts, in thespring, is the best remedy. This, with the use of old manure, — that which has lain a year or more,and been frequently turned over till it becomes tho

Save up to 30% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts

Search stock photos by tags