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Warrington town centre,Bridge Street, Skittles panorama, at Christmas,dusk evening,Cheshire,North West,England,UK,WA1

Warrington town centre,Bridge Street, Skittles panorama, at Christmas,dusk evening,Cheshire,North West,England,UK,WA1 Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2ADR2DE

File size:

83.1 MB (4.1 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

9000 x 3226 px | 76.2 x 27.3 cm | 30 x 10.8 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

4 December 2019

Location:

Bridge St, Warrington,Cheshire,England,UK, WA1 2QW

More information:

TRIBUTES have been paid to the American artist who created Warrington's iconic skittles. Howard Ben Tre died earlier this summer, aged 71. Described as a 'larger than life character' he was famed in the art world for his large-scale glass sculptures. But his work in Warrington was rather different. Howard and first wife Gay won a contest to create public art on Bridge Street and Market Gate after the devastating bombing of 1993. The work was finished in 1999. The couple spent two years overseeing the town centre's transformation, replacing the main thoroughfare with trees, fountains, seating and sculpture that connected the shops. Growing up in New York, he lived in Rhode Island where he has a studio. Howard and Gay, both active in protesting the Vietnam War, married when they were 21. "We had a very adventurous life together," Gay Ben Tré said. He once told her: "Without me, we wouldn't have had as many adventures; without you, we wouldn't have survived." His second wife Wendy MacGaw told the Providence Journal he was a 'force of nature'. Howard returned to Warrington in 2009, ten years after the skittles and fountains had first been revealed. Cllr Mike Hannon, who came up with the idea for the artwork, said it had helped to transform Warrington. He added: “Howard was actually talking about Warrington at an event in York and he got to see it with the trees matured. “It was controversial at the time but if I was asked would I do it again, I would say definitely yes. “I believe in the rationale behind it and experts say we would not have had the investment in the Golden Square with all the money and jobs that brought without the public artworks.”

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