Walter "Wat" Tyler (died 15 June 1381) was a leader of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt in England who opposed the poll tax and demand economic and social reforms. After a meeting with King Richard II, Sir John Newton insulted Tyler. A violent arguement broke out with Newton and William Walworth, Lord Mayor of London. Severely wounded, Tyler managed to ride thirty yards before he fell from his horse. In the disorder that followed, he was taken to a hospital for the poor, but was tracked down by the mayor, brought back to Smithfield, and publicly decapitated.

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Image ID: P03PHY
Walter "Wat" Tyler (died 15 June 1381) was a leader of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt in England. He marched a group of rebels from Canterbury to the capital to oppose the institution of a poll tax and demand economic and social reforms. His meeting with King Richard II seemed to go well, with Tyler treating the king in a friendly manner, and Richard agreeing the rebels "...should have all that he could fairly grant." Sir John Newton (a servant of the king) insulted Tyler by calling him 'the greatest thief and robber in all Kent'. Tyler attacked Newton, but was restrained by William Walworth, Lord Mayor of London. Tyler then attempted to stab the mayor, who slashed his attacker across the neck and head with his sword, and another of the king's servants stabbed Tyler again, severely wounding him. Tyler managed to ride thirty yards before he fell from his horse. In the disorder that followed, he was taken to a hospital for the poor, but was tracked down by the mayor, brought back to Smithfield, and publicly decapitated.
Location: Smithfield, London, UK