Using an ice axe for safety and support, a hiking female ranger with the United States National Park Service (NPS) steps across a fissure in the icy remnant of the receding Grinnell Glacier, a longtime attraction in Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana, USA. The glacier was named for George Bird Grinnell, an early conservationist who discovered the ice field in 1885 and helped the pristine region to be established as America's 10th national park in 1910. Unfortunately the numerous glaciers for which the park is named have suffered from climate change over the years.

Using an ice axe for safety and support, a hiking female ranger with the United States National Park Service (NPS) steps across a fissure in the icy remnant of the receding Grinnell Glacier, a longtime attraction in Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana, USA. The glacier was named for George Bird Grinnell, an early conservationist who discovered the ice field in 1885 and helped the pristine region to be established as America's 10th national park in 1910. Unfortunately the numerous glaciers for which the park is named have suffered from climate change over the years. Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Michele and Tom Grimm / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2DRCJE9

File size:

38.9 MB (2.4 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

4532 x 3000 px | 38.4 x 25.4 cm | 15.1 x 10 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

4 September 2017

Location:

on Grinnell Glacier in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Using an ice axe for safety and support, a hiking female ranger with the United States National Park Service (NPS) steps across a fissure in the icy remnant of the receding Grinnell Glacier, a longtime attraction in Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana, USA. The glacier was named for George Bird Grinnell, an early conservationist who discovered the ice field in 1885 and helped the pristine region to be established as America's 10th national park in 1910. Unfortunately the numerous glaciers for which the park is named have suffered from climate change over the years. From an estimated 146 glaciers in the mid-19th century, only 26 named glaciers remained the park as of 2020.

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