. Unexplored Spain. Hunting; Natural history. Sketches of Spanish Bird-Life 393 II. An Isolated Crag in Andalucia Within an easy half-day's ride from X. lie the cliffs of Chipipi, rising in crenellated tiers from the winding river at their base. It is a lovely May morning. Doves in dozens dash away as we ride through groves of white poplars, and the soft air is filled with their murmurous chorus ; the bush-clad banks are vocal with the song of orioles and nightin- gales, cuckoos, and a score of warblers—Cetti's and Orphean, Sardinian, poly- glotta, Bonelli's. The hand- some rufous warbler, tho

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Image ID: RDMX7B
. Unexplored Spain. Hunting; Natural history. Sketches of Spanish Bird-Life 393 II. An Isolated Crag in Andalucia Within an easy half-day's ride from X. lie the cliffs of Chipipi, rising in crenellated tiers from the winding river at their base. It is a lovely May morning. Doves in dozens dash away as we ride through groves of white poplars, and the soft air is filled with their murmurous chorus ; the bush-clad banks are vocal with the song of orioles and nightin- gales, cuckoos, and a score of warblers—Cetti's and Orphean, Sardinian, poly- glotta, Bonelli's. The hand- some rufous warbler, though not much of a songster, is everywhere conspicuous, flirting a boldly-barred, fan- shaped tail that catches one's eye. There are woodchats, serins, hoopoes; azure-blue rollers squawk, and brilliant bee-eaters poise and chatter overhead—their nest-bur- rows perfora,te the river-bank like a sand-martins' colony. On willow-clad eyots nest lesser ring - dotterels and otters bask; while in the shaded depths beneath the fringing osiers lurk barbel intent to dash at belated grasshopper or cricket. In a thick lentiscus is the nest of a great grey shrike, and while we watch, its owner flies up carrying a lizard in her beak. Half an hour later we see a second shrike, with falcon-like dash, capture another lizard basking in a sunny cranny among the rocks —no mean performance that. There are snakes here also ; one we killed, a coluber, on March 31, was 5|- feet long and contained two rabbits swallowed whole and head first—-one partly digested. Another snake, quite small, struck us as being something new; him we bottled in spirit and despatched to the British Museum. Presently came the reply, thanking us for a " Lizard, Blanus cinereus." Lizard ? Well, we learnt a lesson. There are limbless lizards, and this was one—the subterranean amphis-. SAVI'S WARBLER (Sylvia savii) A spring-migrant, common but very local. Has eggs by mid-April.. Please note that these images are

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