. Types and breeds of farm animals . Livestock. LARGE YORKSHIRE OR LARGE WHITE 543 The introduction of the Large Yorkshire to the United States occurred prior to 1840, and in 1841 a pair was imported by A. B. Allen and brought to Ohio. Undoubtedly specimens of this breed have been brought to America from time to time for over a century. In 1893 Wilcox and Liggett of Minnesota imported some of the more modern type, and from this and Canadian stock have come most of the present Large Yorkshire stock in this country. The people of Canada have been breed- ing Yorkshires for many years, and the mos

- Image ID: PG29K1
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG29K1
. Types and breeds of farm animals . Livestock. LARGE YORKSHIRE OR LARGE WHITE 543 The introduction of the Large Yorkshire to the United States occurred prior to 1840, and in 1841 a pair was imported by A. B. Allen and brought to Ohio. Undoubtedly specimens of this breed have been brought to America from time to time for over a century. In 1893 Wilcox and Liggett of Minnesota imported some of the more modern type, and from this and Canadian stock have come most of the present Large Yorkshire stock in this country. The people of Canada have been breed- ing Yorkshires for many years, and the most important herds in America are in that country. The Large Yorkshire's popularity in the United States has not grown in a substantial or even satisfactory way. Undoubtedly it is a superior bacon producer, raises large litters, and is a meri- torious animal. Its slow-fattening character, its usual lean and leggy type, its inferiority as a feeder, and its white color furnish. Fig. 252. Walton Jewel II, a Middle White sow, first-prize winner at the Royal Agricultural Society of England Show, 1905. Exhibited by Sir Gilbert Greenall, Bart. Photograph from Professor G. E. Day more or less of the objection of the western pork producer. If the people of the United States really had a market for bacon that would justify the feeding of this class of hogs, no doubt the Yorkshire would be more extensively bred and fed. The distribution of the Large Yorkshire is very widespread. Mr. Sanders Spencer has exported them to forty-six different. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Plumb, Charles S. (Charles Sumner), 1860-1939. Boston ; New York : Ginn

Similar stock images