Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . us Siissnfras; and Beaver-wood, because the root is eaten as a great dainty by the beavers, and these animals are caught by means of it. It also grows in the swamps, which they Inhabit; and Michaux tells us that it is felled by them for constructing their dens and houses, in preference to any other tree, on account of the softne

Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . us Siissnfras; and Beaver-wood, because the root is eaten as a great dainty by the beavers, and these animals are caught by means of it. It also grows in the swamps, which they Inhabit; and Michaux tells us that it is felled by them for constructing their dens and houses, in preference to any other tree, on account of the softne Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2ANBA2A

File size:

7.1 MB (245.1 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2303 x 1085 px | 39 x 18.4 cm | 15.4 x 7.2 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . us Siissnfras; and Beaver-wood, because the root is eaten as a great dainty by the beavers, and these animals are caught by means of it. It also grows in the swamps, which they Inhabit; and Michaux tells us that it is felled by them for constructing their dens and houses, in preference to any other tree, on account of the softness of the wood.Engravings. Lodd. Bot. Cab., t. 215.; Sims Bot. Mag., 21G4. ; the plate of this species in Arb. Brit., 1st edit. vol. v. ; and our fig. 35. Sj^ec. Char., S, -c. Almost deciduous. Leaves ellijitical, obtuse, under surfaceglaucous. Flower 9—12-petaled, contracted. Petals ovate, concave. (DonsMillJ) A shrub, or low tree, sometimes sub-evergreen. Massachusetts toMissouri in swamps. Height in America 3 ft. to 10 ft.; 6 ft. to 20 ft. inEngland. Introduced in 1688. Flowers white, 2 in. to 3 in. broad, veryfragrant; June and September. Strobile brownish. Seeds deep scarlet;ripe in October. Decaying leaves yellow, brovvn, or black. Naked youngwood green.. 35. Magn61ia glaaca. ^^aricties. t M. glauca 2 sempervircns Hort. — Sub-evergreen, and with smallerleaves than those of the next variety. t M. glauca 3 Thompsomlm^ Thoinp. M. glauca var. « major Bot. Mag., new edition, p. 36. The plate of this in the Arb. Brit., first edition, vol. v.; and our fig. 36.— It was noticed about 1820, in a pot of seed-lings, by Mr. Thompson, in his nursery at Mile-end ; and by hiin keptdistinct, and propagated under the above name. 26 ARBORETUM ET FRUTICETUM BRITANNICUM.

Save up to 70% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts