Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . North-west ofN. America, on the riverColumbia, in shady pinewoods. Height 2 ft. to 3 ft.Introd. in 1822. Flowersyellow ; October to Marchblue ; ripe in July. According to Torrey and Gray, the stem is so low, that it often scarcelyrises from the ground, and, indeed, is much shorter than the leaves, whichare 1 ft. to 2 ft. in leng

Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . North-west ofN. America, on the riverColumbia, in shady pinewoods. Height 2 ft. to 3 ft.Introd. in 1822. Flowersyellow ; October to Marchblue ; ripe in July. According to Torrey and Gray, the stem is so low, that it often scarcelyrises from the ground, and, indeed, is much shorter than the leaves, whichare 1 ft. to 2 ft. in leng Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2ANAD97

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7.2 MB (350 KB Compressed download)

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1522 x 1642 px | 25.8 x 27.8 cm | 10.1 x 10.9 inches | 150dpi

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Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . North-west ofN. America, on the riverColumbia, in shady pinewoods. Height 2 ft. to 3 ft.Introd. in 1822. Flowersyellow ; October to Marchblue ; ripe in July. According to Torrey and Gray, the stem is so low, that it often scarcelyrises from the ground, and, indeed, is much shorter than the leaves, whichare 1 ft. to 2 ft. in length. Eacemes spi-cate, often 6in. to Sin.long. Flowerslarger than in M. yJquifolium. The pe-tioles of the leaves. Dr. Lindley says, are jointed at every pair of leaflets, in the manner of a bamboo stem.The plant is hardy, and will thrive ina siiady border of peat soil. One ofthe handsomest of undershiubs. a- 4. M. rePENS G. Dan. Thecreeping-roo/ff/ Mahonia, or AshBerberry. Identification. G. Don, in Loud. Hort. Brit., No. 28182.; and in Dons Mil!., 1. p. 118.Synonymes. Berl>cris ^quifSlium I.indl. Bot. Keg., t. 1176. ; Berberis rfipens Ien. Ci/c. iv. p. 2G2.; B. /iquifblium var. rfepens tor. ^ Gia, t/... p. fiO.Engravings. Bot. Reg., t. 117G.; and our fig. 75.. Mahonia nervosa. Berries roundish, glaucous purple, or deep

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