Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . Mill.) A large evergreen tree. North Carolina. Height in NorthAmerica 60 ft. to 70 ft. ; in England 20 ft. to 30 ft. Introduced in 1737.Flowers white, fragrant; June to September. Strobile brown, with scarletseeds ; ripe in October. Decaying leaves yellow and orange, dropping inJune. Young wooti green. Varieties. t M. g. 2 obovu

Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . Mill.) A large evergreen tree. North Carolina. Height in NorthAmerica 60 ft. to 70 ft. ; in England 20 ft. to 30 ft. Introduced in 1737.Flowers white, fragrant; June to September. Strobile brown, with scarletseeds ; ripe in October. Decaying leaves yellow and orange, dropping inJune. Young wooti green. Varieties. t M. g. 2 obovu Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2ANBAWT

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7.2 MB (292.3 KB Compressed download)

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1984 x 1260 px | 33.6 x 21.3 cm | 13.2 x 8.4 inches | 150dpi

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Trees and shrubs; an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum: containing the hardy trees and shrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described; with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species . Mill.) A large evergreen tree. North Carolina. Height in NorthAmerica 60 ft. to 70 ft. ; in England 20 ft. to 30 ft. Introduced in 1737.Flowers white, fragrant; June to September. Strobile brown, with scarletseeds ; ripe in October. Decaying leaves yellow and orange, dropping inJune. Young wooti green. Varieties. t M. g. 2 obovuta Ait. — Leaves obovate-oblong. Flowers expanded.(Hort. Kew., iii. p. 329.) This seems to be the only variety founilin a wild state. In British gardens it is a luagnificent plant, thebroad ends of its leaves forming a conspicuous feature, and distin-guishing it readily from the original species, the leaves of which arepointed ; but it does not (lower freely. III. UAGtiOLTJCE^: MAGNOY/.^. 23 M. g. 3 exoniensis Hort, M. g, lanceolata Ait.; M. g. stricta Hort.;M. g. ferruginea Hort. The Exmouth Magnolia. (Bot. Mag., t.1952.; Bot. Cab., t. 1814.; the plate in Arb. Brit., 1st edition, vol. v.;and OUT Jig. 33.) — The leavea are oblong-elliptical, generally rusty. 33. Magn61£a grandiflora exoniensis. underneath. Flowers somewhat contracted. This is the mostdistinct of all the varieties of the species, and, on account of itsflowering early and freely, the one best deserving of general culture.It forms a tall, fastigiate, elegant bush, or tree, and has attainedthe height of 30 ft., as a standard, at various places in the South o*^England, t M. g. 4 angusfifdlia Hort. ?— Leaves lanceolate, pointed at both extre-mities, wavy. A very distinct variet}, introduced from Paris about1825, which has not yet flowered in England.1 M. g. 5 proBcox Andry.—Leaves oval-oblong. Flowers fully expanded.This is an early variety, introduced from Paris about 1830. Theflowers are as large as those o

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