. Trees and shrubs : an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum : containing the hardy trees and schrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described : with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species. Trees; Shrubs; Forests and forestry. 734 ARBORETUM ET FRUTICETUM BRITANNICUM. The species is propagated by the nut; which, when the tree is to be grown chiefly for its timber, is best sown where it is finally to remain, on account of the taproot, which will thus have its full influence on the vigour and prosperity of the tr

. Trees and shrubs : an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum : containing the hardy trees and schrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described : with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species. Trees; Shrubs; Forests and forestry. 734 ARBORETUM ET FRUTICETUM BRITANNICUM. The species is propagated by the nut; which, when the tree is to be grown chiefly for its timber, is best sown where it is finally to remain, on account of the taproot, which will thus have its full influence on the vigour and prosperity of the tr Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RDF00K

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7.1 MB (243.6 KB Compressed download)

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1375 x 1816 px | 23.3 x 30.8 cm | 9.2 x 12.1 inches | 150dpi

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. Trees and shrubs : an abridgment of the Arboretum et fruticetum britannicum : containing the hardy trees and schrubs of Britain, native and foreign, scientifically and popularly described : with their propagation, culture and uses and engravings of nearly all the species. Trees; Shrubs; Forests and forestry. 734 ARBORETUM ET FRUTICETUM BRITANNICUM. The species is propagated by the nut; which, when the tree is to be grown chiefly for its timber, is best sown where it is finally to remain, on account of the taproot, which will thus have its full influence on the vigour and prosperity of the tree. Where the tree is to be grown for fruit on dry soils, or in rocky, situations, it ought also to be sown where it is finally to remain, for the same reasons. In soils on moist or other- wise unfavourable subsoils, if sown where it is finally to remain, a tile, slate, or flat stone, should be placed under the nut at the depth of 3 or 4 inches, in order to give the taproot a horizontal direction ; or, if this pre- caution has been neglected, after the plants have come iip, the taproot may be cut through with a spade 6 or 8 inches below the nut, as is sometimes practised in nurseries with young plants of the horsechestnut, sweet chestnut, walnut, and oak. On the other hand, when the walnut is planted in soil which has a dry or rocky subsoil, or among rocks, no precaution of this sort is necessary : on the contrary, it would be injurious, by preventing the taproot from descending, and deriving that nourishment from the subsoil which, from the nature of the surface soil, it could not there obtain. The varieties may be propagated by bud- ding, grafting, inarching, or layering, in common soil. The walnut tree attains the largest size in a deep loamy soil, dry rather than moist; but the fruit has the best flavour, and produces most oil, when the tree is grown in cal- careous soils, or among calcareous rocks : in a wet-bottomed soil, whatever may be the character of the surface, it w

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