Travels in Palestine, through the countries of Bashan and Cilead, east of the River Jordan; including a visit to the cities of Geraza and Gamala, in the Decapolis . re, like that ofClazomense, in the gulf of Smyrna, to the conti-nent, and whose works of grandeur, made sub-servient to public utility, soften in some degreethe darker shades of his all-conquering cha-racter. We quitted the village of Ras-el-Ain at nineoclock, and keeping close by the sea-side, camein half an hour to the bed of a river now dry,but over which had once been thrown a stonebridge, the broken fragments of which stillrem

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Travels in Palestine, through the countries of Bashan and Cilead, east of the River Jordan; including a visit to the cities of Geraza and Gamala, in the Decapolis . re, like that ofClazomense, in the gulf of Smyrna, to the conti-nent, and whose works of grandeur, made sub-servient to public utility, soften in some degreethe darker shades of his all-conquering cha-racter. We quitted the village of Ras-el-Ain at nineoclock, and keeping close by the sea-side, camein half an hour to the bed of a river now dry,but over which had once been thrown a stonebridge, the broken fragments of which stillrem Stock Photo
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Travels in Palestine, through the countries of Bashan and Cilead, east of the River Jordan; including a visit to the cities of Geraza and Gamala, in the Decapolis . re, like that ofClazomense, in the gulf of Smyrna, to the conti-nent, and whose works of grandeur, made sub-servient to public utility, soften in some degreethe darker shades of his all-conquering cha-racter. We quitted the village of Ras-el-Ain at nineoclock, and keeping close by the sea-side, camein half an hour to the bed of a river now dry,but over which had once been thrown a stonebridge, the broken fragments of which stillrem
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Travels in Palestine, through the countries of Bashan and Cilead, east of the River Jordan; including a visit to the cities of Geraza and Gamala, in the Decapolis . re, like that ofClazomense, in the gulf of Smyrna, to the conti-nent, and whose works of grandeur, made sub-servient to public utility, soften in some degreethe darker shades of his all-conquering cha-racter. We quitted the village of Ras-el-Ain at nineoclock, and keeping close by the sea-side, camein half an hour to the bed of a river now dry,but over which had once been thrown a stonebridge, the broken fragments of which stillremained. At half past ten, we passed through a con-siderable space covered with the ruins of formerbuildings, whose foundations only were apparent.It was close to the sea, and seemed to mark thesite of some ancient settlement, from the appear-ance of the materials there; but whether thesewere what had been thought by some to be theremains of the Palactyrus of the continent or not,we could not determine. On the summit of the hill to the eastward ofus was the small village of Shimmah, with aminaret rising from its centre. Though the DO JOURNEY FROM SOOR TO ACRE.. JOURNEY FROM SOOR TO ACRE. 91 hills themselves were in general steep and barren,the narrow plain between their base and thesea was, for the most part, cultivated. At Ras-el-Ain, where water was always to becommanded in abundance, we had seen sugar-canes already from two to three feet aboveground ; but here, where they were solely de-pendant on rain, they were ploughing the groundfor corn. Oxen were yoked in pairs for thispurpose, and the plough was small and of simpleconstruction, so that it appeared necessary fortwo to follow each other in the same furrow, asthey invariably did so. * The husbandman,holding the plough with one hand by a handlelike that of a walking-crutch, bore in the othera goad of seven or eight feet in length, armedwith a sharp point of iron at one end, and atthe other with a plate of the same metal sha