Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Ttans. Royal S o c. E din* Vol XXIX, Plate V. Fig. 5 Fig. 13.. Fiq. 2 /jp*;. Fig. 10. R.H.Txa^ua.iT,MD. del. 1. Ruth, Iittir Earn CHEIRODU S. ??•& Trans. Roy. Soc.Ediir Vol. XXIX, Plate VI.
RM2AM74GMTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Ttans. Royal S o c. E din* Vol XXIX, Plate V. Fig. 5 Fig. 13.. Fiq. 2 /jp*;. Fig. 10. R.H.Txa^ua.iT,MD. del. 1. Ruth, Iittir Earn CHEIRODU S. ??•& Trans. Roy. Soc.Ediir Vol. XXIX, Plate VI.
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Fig. 18.—Intrusive dolerite sheetenclosing and sending threads intoportions of shale, Salisbury Crags,Edinburgh. ^WSji^. Fig. 19.—Intrusive sheet enveloping shales. Bed of Linhonse Water. Geol. Survey Memoir of Edinburgh District, p. 115. VBSb -
RM2AM7BHGTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Fig. 18.—Intrusive dolerite sheetenclosing and sending threads intoportions of shale, Salisbury Crags,Edinburgh. ^WSji^. Fig. 19.—Intrusive sheet enveloping shales. Bed of Linhonse Water. Geol. Survey Memoir of Edinburgh District, p. 115. VBSb -
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Trans Roy. Soc. Edmr Vol. XXIX, Plate IV. Fig. Z Fig. 3. Fig. 4 Fig. 5.. R.H.iP.ATra.qiiatr,del F Hutti, lift Earn* FIG? 1-9, MESOLEPIS. 10-11, EURYSOMUS. 12-15, WARDICHTHYS.
RM2AM75GDTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Trans Roy. Soc. Edmr Vol. XXIX, Plate IV. Fig. Z Fig. 3. Fig. 4 Fig. 5.. R.H.iP.ATra.qiiatr,del F Hutti, lift Earn* FIG? 1-9, MESOLEPIS. 10-11, EURYSOMUS. 12-15, WARDICHTHYS.
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . 25000 30|000 W&A-K.JolmstJDn. Edinb-or^L.riiid J Trans. Roy. Soc. Edrrr* Vol. XXIX, Plate III.. Fig. 15. R.H.Tra^uaii.M.D. del* F. Hvrtli, Lift* Elm* Figs 1-16 EURYNOTUS, Fig. 17 BENEDENIUS
RM2AM76N7Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . 25000 30|000 W&A-K.JolmstJDn. Edinb-or^L.riiid J Trans. Roy. Soc. Edrrr* Vol. XXIX, Plate III.. Fig. 15. R.H.Tra^uaii.M.D. del* F. Hvrtli, Lift* Elm* Figs 1-16 EURYNOTUS, Fig. 17 BENEDENIUS
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Fiq. 2 /jp*;. Fig. 10. R.H.Txa^ua.iT,MD. del. 1. Ruth, Iittir Earn CHEIRODU S. ??•& Trans. Roy. Soc.Ediir Vol. XXIX, Plate VI.. R H Tra^uair, M.D del. FIG! 1 F.Hufli.Litti* Edm1 PLATYSOMUS. 12&16,PAL£.0NISCUS.I3, DAPEDIUS. 14, 15, GYRODUS.
RM2AM73X8Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . Fiq. 2 /jp*;. Fig. 10. R.H.Txa^ua.iT,MD. del. 1. Ruth, Iittir Earn CHEIRODU S. ??•& Trans. Roy. Soc.Ediir Vol. XXIX, Plate VI.. R H Tra^uair, M.D del. FIG! 1 F.Hufli.Litti* Edm1 PLATYSOMUS. 12&16,PAL£.0NISCUS.I3, DAPEDIUS. 14, 15, GYRODUS.
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . a Fig. 3.—Ground plan of volcanic vents. teristic forms of vents. Some of the eccentricities of outline no doubt arosefrom the irregular way inwhich the rocks throughwhich an orifice was drilledyielded to the forces ofexplosion. This is oftenwell shown by the veinsand nests of tuff or ag-glomerate which have beenforced into the rents orsinuosities of the orifices.In other cases, however,it is probable that whatappears now as onevolcanic neck, was theresult of a shifting of theactual funnel of discharge,
RM2AM7GR7Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . a Fig. 3.—Ground plan of volcanic vents. teristic forms of vents. Some of the eccentricities of outline no doubt arosefrom the irregular way inwhich the rocks throughwhich an orifice was drilledyielded to the forces ofexplosion. This is oftenwell shown by the veinsand nests of tuff or ag-glomerate which have beenforced into the rents orsinuosities of the orifices.In other cases, however,it is probable that whatappears now as onevolcanic neck, was theresult of a shifting of theactual funnel of discharge,
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . ^ <%k^^^^ Fig. 23.—Section in WardlawQuarry, Linlithgowshire.. Fig. 24.— Section of Calton Hill, Edinburgh. of this thoroughly volcanic series of rocks passes conformably under theCalciferous sandstones and shales shown at the right hand of the diagram. As the interstratified lavas and tuffs were laid down in sheets at the surface,they necessarily behave like the ordinary sedimentary strata, and have under-gone with them the curvatures and fractures which have affected this regionsince Carboniferous times. Notwithstanding their volcanic natu
RM2AM79HDTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . ^ <%k^^^^ Fig. 23.—Section in WardlawQuarry, Linlithgowshire.. Fig. 24.— Section of Calton Hill, Edinburgh. of this thoroughly volcanic series of rocks passes conformably under theCalciferous sandstones and shales shown at the right hand of the diagram. As the interstratified lavas and tuffs were laid down in sheets at the surface,they necessarily behave like the ordinary sedimentary strata, and have under-gone with them the curvatures and fractures which have affected this regionsince Carboniferous times. Notwithstanding their volcanic natu
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . a Fig. 3.—Ground plan of volcanic vents. teristic forms of vents. Some of the eccentricities of outline no doubt arosefrom the irregular way inwhich the rocks throughwhich an orifice was drilledyielded to the forces ofexplosion. This is oftenwell shown by the veinsand nests of tuff or ag-glomerate which have beenforced into the rents orsinuosities of the orifices.In other cases, however,it is probable that whatappears now as onevolcanic neck, was theresult of a shifting of theactual funnel of discharge,. Fig 4.—Plan of volcanic necks at Kellie L
RM2AM7GC0Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . a Fig. 3.—Ground plan of volcanic vents. teristic forms of vents. Some of the eccentricities of outline no doubt arosefrom the irregular way inwhich the rocks throughwhich an orifice was drilledyielded to the forces ofexplosion. This is oftenwell shown by the veinsand nests of tuff or ag-glomerate which have beenforced into the rents orsinuosities of the orifices.In other cases, however,it is probable that whatappears now as onevolcanic neck, was theresult of a shifting of theactual funnel of discharge,. Fig 4.—Plan of volcanic necks at Kellie L
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . rt of the small intestine contained only 35 cc. of fluid; but whetherdue to a purgative action of the menispermin, or of the baptisin, could not beapparent from this experiment. Experiment 56. Dog that had fasted seventeen hours. Weight 157kilogrammes (fig. 56).—Two cc. of bile and 2 cc. of water were injected into the PHYSIOLOGICAL ACTIONS OF DRUGS ON THE SECRETION OF BILE. 211 duodenum at b. This producing no perceptible effect on the secretion, fivegrains of menispermin were triturated with the same amount of bile and water,and injected into
RM2AM7YAHTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . rt of the small intestine contained only 35 cc. of fluid; but whetherdue to a purgative action of the menispermin, or of the baptisin, could not beapparent from this experiment. Experiment 56. Dog that had fasted seventeen hours. Weight 157kilogrammes (fig. 56).—Two cc. of bile and 2 cc. of water were injected into the PHYSIOLOGICAL ACTIONS OF DRUGS ON THE SECRETION OF BILE. 211 duodenum at b. This producing no perceptible effect on the secretion, fivegrains of menispermin were triturated with the same amount of bile and water,and injected into
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . amountof bile in the dejections of man, and our negative results as to any stimulatingeffect on the bile-secreting mechanism of the dog. Action of Morphia. As morphia has the well-known power of arresting diarrhoea and ofproducing constipation, it is desirable to know whether this is to be ascribed to its effect onthe intestine alone, oralso to a power of di-minishing the secretionof bile. Experiment 71. Dogthat had fasted eighteenhours. Weight 33 kilo-grammes (fig. 71).—Onegrain of morphia hydro-chlorate in 3 cc. of bileand water was injectedin
RM2AM7MYWTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . amountof bile in the dejections of man, and our negative results as to any stimulatingeffect on the bile-secreting mechanism of the dog. Action of Morphia. As morphia has the well-known power of arresting diarrhoea and ofproducing constipation, it is desirable to know whether this is to be ascribed to its effect onthe intestine alone, oralso to a power of di-minishing the secretionof bile. Experiment 71. Dogthat had fasted eighteenhours. Weight 33 kilo-grammes (fig. 71).—Onegrain of morphia hydro-chlorate in 3 cc. of bileand water was injectedin
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . t1). After both dosesthere was a greaterincrease in the biliarysecretion than was at all likely to have been caused by the same quantity of water. (See Experiment 7.)Necropsy.—The taraxacum had passed along nearly the whole length of the small intestine. Most of the fluid had been absorbed. There was no evidence of purgative action. Experiment 43a. Small dog that had fasted eighteen hours.—120 grains of solid extract of taraxacum in 15cc. of water were injected into theduodenum (t, fig. 43a), and thisdose was repeated in two-and-a-half hours. Th
RM2AM86CNTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . t1). After both dosesthere was a greaterincrease in the biliarysecretion than was at all likely to have been caused by the same quantity of water. (See Experiment 7.)Necropsy.—The taraxacum had passed along nearly the whole length of the small intestine. Most of the fluid had been absorbed. There was no evidence of purgative action. Experiment 43a. Small dog that had fasted eighteen hours.—120 grains of solid extract of taraxacum in 15cc. of water were injected into theduodenum (t, fig. 43a), and thisdose was repeated in two-and-a-half hours. Th
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . dinburgh.—Thedolerite is exceedingly close-grained, becoming here and there, especially along theedges, quite black and opaque. At the lower portion of the field it is seen to be full ofmicrolites of titaniferous iron or magnetite. It encloses numerous perfectly formedprisms of triclinic felspar. The shale consists of a porcellanised base, with clearround granules of quartz. See p. 497. Fig. 12. Dolerite from edge of sheet near contact with sandstone, Gartness, Airdrie.—The large prisms of triclinic felspar and patches of titaniferous iron are t
RM2AM78R5Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . dinburgh.—Thedolerite is exceedingly close-grained, becoming here and there, especially along theedges, quite black and opaque. At the lower portion of the field it is seen to be full ofmicrolites of titaniferous iron or magnetite. It encloses numerous perfectly formedprisms of triclinic felspar. The shale consists of a porcellanised base, with clearround granules of quartz. See p. 497. Fig. 12. Dolerite from edge of sheet near contact with sandstone, Gartness, Airdrie.—The large prisms of triclinic felspar and patches of titaniferous iron are t
Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . es of gout, but itsaction on the liver has not hithertobeen tested by direct experiment.Two grains of the extract is themaximum dose for a man. Experiment 16. Dog that hadfasted sixteen hours. Weight 23*5kilogrammes.—Sixty grains of theaqueous extract of colchicum of theBritish Pharmacopoeia in 10 cc. of water were injected into the duodenum(c, fig. 16). In an hour the biliary secretion began to increase, and five hoursafter the injection it was nearly five times more than before the drug wasgiven. The secretion then fell, and just at the close
RM2AM8DEGTransactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh . es of gout, but itsaction on the liver has not hithertobeen tested by direct experiment.Two grains of the extract is themaximum dose for a man. Experiment 16. Dog that hadfasted sixteen hours. Weight 23*5kilogrammes.—Sixty grains of theaqueous extract of colchicum of theBritish Pharmacopoeia in 10 cc. of water were injected into the duodenum(c, fig. 16). In an hour the biliary secretion began to increase, and five hoursafter the injection it was nearly five times more than before the drug wasgiven. The secretion then fell, and just at the close