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Timber Framed House under construction Eskbank Dalkeith Midlothian Scotland UK showing silver reflective foil

Timber Framed House under construction Eskbank Dalkeith Midlothian Scotland UK showing silver reflective foil Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

DDY30A

File size:

34.3 MB (1.5 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

4000 x 3000 px | 33.9 x 25.4 cm | 13.3 x 10 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

31 August 2013

Location:

Eskbank, Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, UK

More information:

In the United States and Canada, timber-frame construction has been revived since the 1970s and is now experiencing a thriving renaissance of the ancient skills. This is largely due to such practitioners as Steve Chappell, Jack Sobon, and Tedd Benson, who studied old plans and techniques and revived a long-neglected technique. Once a handcrafted skill passed down, timber-frame construction has now been modernized with the help of modern industrial tools such as the CNC machines. These machines and mass-production techniques have assisted growth and made for more affordable frames and shorter lead-times for projects. Timber-framed structures differ from conventional wood-framed buildings in several ways. Timber framing uses fewer, larger wooden members, commonly timbers in the range of 15 to 30 cm (6" to 12"), while common wood framing uses many more timbers with dimensions usually in the 5 to 25 cm (2" to 10") range. The methods of fastening the frame members also differ. In conventional framing, the members are joined using nails or other mechanical fasteners, whereas timber framing uses the traditional mortice and tenon or more complex joints that are usually fastened using only wooden pegs.[13] Modern complex structures and timber trusses often incorporate steel joinery such as gusset plates, for both structural and architectural purposes. Recently, it has become common practice to enclose the timber structure entirely in manufactured panels such as SIPs (Structural Insulated Panels). Although the timbers can only be seen from inside the building when so enclosed, construction is less complex and insulation is greater than in traditional timber building.

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