This is a porcelain photo advertising sign of the Loree Colliery Larksville Pennsylvania.The Hudson Coal Company incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1871 as a subsidiary of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. The Hudson Coal Company figured prominently in the anthracite coal industry through the late 19th and early 20th centuries.The coal breaker began operation on June 22, 1919,In 1921 the breaker produced 1,590,201 tons of anthracite and in 1926 there were just over 3,000 employees at the colliery.Production declined in the coming decades and the breaker closed in the 1960s.

- Image ID: P49K48
This is a porcelain photo advertising sign of the Loree Colliery Larksville Pennsylvania.The Hudson Coal Company incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1871 as a subsidiary of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. The Hudson Coal Company figured prominently in the anthracite coal industry through the late 19th and early 20th centuries.The coal breaker began operation on June 22, 1919,In 1921 the breaker produced 1,590,201 tons of anthracite and in 1926 there were just over 3,000 employees at the colliery.Production declined in the coming decades and the breaker closed in the 1960s.
Arthur Miller / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: P49K48
his is a porcelain photo advertising sign of the Loree Colliery Larksville Pennsylvania. The Hudson Coal Company incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1871 as a subsidiary of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, which became the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company in 1899. The Hudson Coal Company figured prominently in the anthracite coal industry through the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The coal breaker was completely electrical and began operation on June 22, 1919, cleaning 6,000 tons per day. It was renamed the Loree after L.F. Loree, president of the D&H Railroad. By the late 1930s, the company was in decline, and in the early 1960s it was acquired by the Glen Alden Corporation. In 1921 the breaker produced 1,590,201 tons of anthracite and in 1926 there were just over 3,000 employees at the colliery. Production declined in the coming decades and the breaker closed in the 1960s.
Location: Larksville, PA, USA