This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. Thi

- Image ID: PBT5FK
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. Thi
Ivy Close Images / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PBT5FK
This illustration dates to the 1870s and shows Nasmyth's Steam Hammer. James Nasmyth was a Scottish engineer who gained fame for his development of the steam hammer. He was co-founder of Nasmyth, Gaskell and Company manufacturers of machine tools. With the steam hammer, the steam is admitted below the piston, which is thus raised to any required height within the limits of the stroke. When the communication with the boiler is shut off and the steam below the piston is allowed to escape, the piston, with the mass of ironforming the hammer attached to the piston-rod, falls by its own weight. This weight, in large steam hammers, amounts to several tons; and the force of the blow will depend jointly upon the weight of the hammer, and upon the height from which it is allowed to fall. The steam is admitted and allowed to escape by valves, moved by a lever under the control of a workman.