The XVIIIth century; its institutions, customs, and costumes France, 1700-1789 . a la Henri IV. for men did not fare anybetter, though the leaders of fashion, at the request of the ComtedArtois and Marie-Antoinette, endeavoured to Introduce it, as aCourt-dress, at the private entertainments given by the Princes ofblood. The Comte de Segur, who took part In them, says : Thiscostume was well enough for young men, but It did not at all suitmiddle-aged men, especially If they were short and Inclined to corpu-lence. The silk mantles, the feathers, ribbons, and brilliant colours,made them look ridic

The XVIIIth century; its institutions, customs, and costumes France, 1700-1789 . a la Henri IV. for men did not fare anybetter, though the leaders of fashion, at the request of the ComtedArtois and Marie-Antoinette, endeavoured to Introduce it, as aCourt-dress, at the private entertainments given by the Princes ofblood. The Comte de Segur, who took part In them, says : Thiscostume was well enough for young men, but It did not at all suitmiddle-aged men, especially If they were short and Inclined to corpu-lence. The silk mantles, the feathers, ribbons, and brilliant colours,made them look ridic Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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The XVIIIth century; its institutions, customs, and costumes France, 1700-1789 . a la Henri IV. for men did not fare anybetter, though the leaders of fashion, at the request of the ComtedArtois and Marie-Antoinette, endeavoured to Introduce it, as aCourt-dress, at the private entertainments given by the Princes ofblood. The Comte de Segur, who took part In them, says : Thiscostume was well enough for young men, but It did not at all suitmiddle-aged men, especially If they were short and Inclined to corpu-lence. The silk mantles, the feathers, ribbons, and brilliant colours,made them look ridiculous. The two sexes seemed to compete with one another In fashion-able matters, and, as a general rule, a name given to some article of DJi£SS AXD FASHIONS. 471 female dress eventually came to be used for male attire. After themarriage of Louis XV. with Marie Leczinska (1725) the fashionswere all a la polonaise. The campaigns of Hungary and Germanyled to the introduction of hongrclines, Avhich had been in vogue acentury before. The marriage of the Dauphin to the Infanta of. !? ig. ^}f^—1 he laJ!ci Uiljr ; ;i!ter W.iUeau. Spain (1745) led to a revival of Spanish fashions, which had neverentirely died out at the French Court, where they had so oftenenjoyed high favour. Thus, in i 729, there was a revival of mantillas,not only in black and white lace or other light stuffs, but in velvet,satin, and even in fur. These mantillas were not worn upon thehead, but the two ends were tied across the waist. The toilette ofladies who followed the fashions was completed by many accessoryobjects which were held to be indispensable to the dress of a ladyof good condition or of ban ton; as for instance, trinkets, watches, 472 THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. caskets, fans, and even canes. Men had always carried canes, whichwere made of bamboo, ebony wood, &c., witli the head made ofmetal or some other substance. The long gold-headed cane, oncecalled cane a la Tronchin and afterwards a. la Voltaire, w

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