. The world's inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands. ficed to bring about.Changes of population have been com-paratively rapid in Siberia. Many remainson the borders of the lakes show that abusy population occupied the country inthe neolithic or polished stone period ; andit appears probable that successive popu-lations, worsted in the strife for dominance,were driven constantly northward; and more than one race of the pastmay

. The world's inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands. ficed to bring about.Changes of population have been com-paratively rapid in Siberia. Many remainson the borders of the lakes show that abusy population occupied the country inthe neolithic or polished stone period ; andit appears probable that successive popu-lations, worsted in the strife for dominance,were driven constantly northward; and more than one race of the pastmay Stock Photo
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Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AFTE9N

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7.2 MB (321.6 KB Compressed download)

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1496 x 1671 px | 25.3 x 28.3 cm | 10 x 11.1 inches | 150dpi

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. The world's inhabitants; or, Mankind, animals, and plants; being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands. ficed to bring about.Changes of population have been com-paratively rapid in Siberia. Many remainson the borders of the lakes show that abusy population occupied the country inthe neolithic or polished stone period ; andit appears probable that successive popu-lations, worsted in the strife for dominance, were driven constantly northward; and more than one race of the pastmay have wasted and perished in the inhospitable regions of NorthernFormer Siberia. The name of Yeniseans has been given to an earlyinhabitants, j-ace of Siberians ; but little is known of them. The Ugro-Samoyedes apparently followed them north, some time before the Christianera, and estabhshed a bronze period and a much higher grade of civilisa-The tion than that of the preceding race. From about the fifthKhagasses. ^^ ^.j^^ thirteenth centuries a Turkish stock (^the Khagasses)migrated into the same region, subjugating the native population, intro-ducing iron, employing bronae for artistic purposes, and manufacturing. THE INHABITANTS OF SIBERIA. 411 pottery of very good design. Many remains of them are preserved in theHermitage Museum at St. Petersburg. In the 13th century the The Mongoladvancing Mongolian empire, under Jenghiz Khan, conquered Empire.these Turkish people, and in destroying their civilisation did not bringin anything better. The country underwent continuous decline, until the Russians, in thesixteenth century, having established their empire in Europe firmly, began to turn their attention eastwards. Various Tartar Russianinvaders gained an ascendency over the tribes east of the conquests.Urals, and there came into collision with the Russian colonists. In 1555,

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