The Virgin of Guadalupe with the Four Apparitions. Artist: Nicolás Enríquez (Mexican, 1704-1790). Dimensions: 22 1/4 × 16 1/2 in. (56.5 × 41.9 cm) Framed: 25 1/4 × 19 7/8 × 1 3/8 in. (64.1 × 50.5 × 3.5 cm). Date: 1773. In 1773, when Nicolás Enríquez painted this copy of the Virgin of Guadalupe, it was the most widely venerated sacred image in New Spain. In this painting the miraculous image is encircled by four scenes that attest to its divine origin. They record the Virgin's three appearances to the Indian Juan Diego at Tepeyac, near Mexico City, and culminate in the revelation of her image

- Image ID: PATFFE
The Virgin of Guadalupe with the Four Apparitions. Artist: Nicolás Enríquez (Mexican, 1704-1790). Dimensions: 22 1/4 × 16 1/2 in. (56.5 × 41.9 cm) Framed: 25 1/4 × 19 7/8 × 1 3/8 in. (64.1 × 50.5 × 3.5 cm). Date: 1773. In 1773, when Nicolás Enríquez painted this copy of the Virgin of Guadalupe, it was the most widely venerated sacred image in New Spain. In this painting the miraculous image is encircled by four scenes that attest to its divine origin. They record the Virgin's three appearances to the Indian Juan Diego at Tepeyac, near Mexico City, and culminate in the revelation of her image
Album / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PATFFE
The Virgin of Guadalupe with the Four Apparitions. Artist: Nicolás Enríquez (Mexican, 1704-1790). Dimensions: 22 1/4 × 16 1/2 in. (56.5 × 41.9 cm) Framed: 25 1/4 × 19 7/8 × 1 3/8 in. (64.1 × 50.5 × 3.5 cm). Date: 1773. In 1773, when Nicolás Enríquez painted this copy of the Virgin of Guadalupe, it was the most widely venerated sacred image in New Spain. In this painting the miraculous image is encircled by four scenes that attest to its divine origin. They record the Virgin's three appearances to the Indian Juan Diego at Tepeyac, near Mexico City, and culminate in the revelation of her image imprinted on his cloak. An inscription reveals that this copy was sanctified by contact with the original in 1789, sixteen years after it was painted. This painting is one of a set of five (2014.171-.175) created in 1773 by Enríquez for the private devotional use of Juan Bautista Echeverría, a Spanish-born merchant. Museum: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.