. The Victoria history of the county of Lancaster;. Natural history. A HISTORY OF LANCASHIRE PRESTON RIBBLETOX GRI.MSARGH and BROCKHOLES PRESTON ELSTON FISHWICK BROUGHTON HAIGHTON BARTON LEA, ASHTON, INGOL and COTTAM The parish of Preston lies on the north bank of the Ribble, and has an area of 16,116 acres, in- cluding 207 acres of tidal water. The population in 1901 was 115,483, mostly within the borough of Preston. The surface is undulating, with a general rise towards the north and east. The history of the parish is practically that of the town which has given its name to the whole. The o

- Image ID: PG03TB
. The Victoria history of the county of Lancaster;. Natural history. A HISTORY OF LANCASHIRE PRESTON RIBBLETOX GRI.MSARGH and BROCKHOLES PRESTON ELSTON FISHWICK BROUGHTON HAIGHTON BARTON LEA, ASHTON, INGOL and COTTAM The parish of Preston lies on the north bank of the Ribble, and has an area of 16,116 acres, in- cluding 207 acres of tidal water. The population in 1901 was 115,483, mostly within the borough of Preston. The surface is undulating, with a general rise towards the north and east. The history of the parish is practically that of the town which has given its name to the whole. The o
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG03TB
. The Victoria history of the county of Lancaster;. Natural history. A HISTORY OF LANCASHIRE PRESTON RIBBLETOX GRI.MSARGH and BROCKHOLES PRESTON ELSTON FISHWICK BROUGHTON HAIGHTON BARTON LEA, ASHTON, INGOL and COTTAM The parish of Preston lies on the north bank of the Ribble, and has an area of 16,116 acres, in- cluding 207\ acres of tidal water. The population in 1901 was 115,483, mostly within the borough of Preston. The surface is undulating, with a general rise towards the north and east. The history of the parish is practically that of the town which has given its name to the whole. The old portion of the town occupies the centre of a PRESTON. table-land between two brooks which flow south-west into the Ribble,1 this navigable river completing the boundary on the south side. Along each side of the Ribble are level tracts of low-lying land, but just at the town the surface rises sharply from the river to the table-land named. To the west of the town was the marsh, while a moor extended itself along the northern boundary. The main street ran from east to west, being the continuation of the road from the south across Ribble Bridge, into which at the entrance of the town came a road from Ribchester. The street had a continuation down to the riverside, but its main line turned to the north-west, and after passing out of the town divided, part forming the main road north and part going west to Kirkham. On the south side of the main street stood the parish church, while on the opposite side, further west, just at the turning was the moot hall, with the market place behind it. These streets and buildings, though improved and renewed on a grander scale, have remained predominant features of the town. The traces of early history are but scanty.3 From the Roman station at Walton-le- Dale on the south bank of the Ribble, the north road, cross- ing the river by a ford, passed through Preston,3 and as this place had good communication westward by water and stood in the centr

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