. The Victoria history of the county of Hertford. Natural history. EDWINSTREE HUNDRED own expense and stored ' arms sufficient to arm about looo men' at HaJham Hall, which were seized by the Parliamentarians during his absence in August 1642.'!'* In March 164.4.-5 Hadham Hall was again visited by the Parliamentarians and forty-four horses and other cattle and stores were carried away. After this time the stables stood empty.^i Lord Capell had been impeached in 1642 for endangering the peace of the realm by his support of the king. His pro- perty was sequestrated and in 1643 the manor-house and

- Image ID: PG04PT
. The Victoria history of the county of Hertford. Natural history. EDWINSTREE HUNDRED own expense and stored ' arms sufficient to arm about looo men' at HaJham Hall, which were seized by the Parliamentarians during his absence in August 1642.'!'* In March 164.4.-5 Hadham Hall was again visited by the Parliamentarians and forty-four horses and other cattle and stores were carried away. After this time the stables stood empty.^i Lord Capell had been impeached in 1642 for endangering the peace of the realm by his support of the king. His pro- perty was sequestrated and in 1643 the manor-house and
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG04PT
. The Victoria history of the county of Hertford. Natural history. EDWINSTREE HUNDRED own expense and stored ' arms sufficient to arm about looo men' at HaJham Hall, which were seized by the Parliamentarians during his absence in August 1642.'!'* In March 164.4.-5 Hadham Hall was again visited by the Parliamentarians and forty-four horses and other cattle and stores were carried away. After this time the stables stood empty.^i Lord Capell had been impeached in 1642 for endangering the peace of the realm by his support of the king. His pro- perty was sequestrated and in 1643 the manor-house and park of Little H.idham were among the delinquents' estates charged with the payment of an annuity of j^ 10,000 to the Earl of Essex, captain-general of the Parliamentary forces.^^ Little Hadham was, however, let to William Capell, uncle of Lord Capell, that he might preserve the houses and woods there."-" Lord Capell compounded for his estates in 1646-7, on the close of the iirst war, and retired to live at Hadham Hall. To his influence the outbreak of the second Civil War was largely due."^ He again took up arms, and was one of the Royalist generals besieged in Colchester in 1648.'*^ While he was away the Parliamentarians sent a sergeant and two men to Hadham Hall to seize his son Arthur Capell, then aged sixteen, whom they took to Colchester and carried round the town every day, hoping to influence his father. As this had no effect he was allowed to return home."^ In June 1648 Lord Capell's estates were again seized by Parliament and granted to trustees for raising j^50,ooo for the relief of Ireland."^ Colchester surrendered in August 1648 and Lord Capell was sent to the Tower. In March of the following year he was beheaded.^' His son Arthur succeeded to his title and claimed his estates. These were ordered to be restored to him, but the order taking no effect he again petitioned Parliament in 1651, claiming that by the settlement of his grand- fathe

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