. The Victoria history of the county of Hertford. Natural history. A HISTORY OF HERTFORDSHIRE th. :hcn, but the stair itself is very plain. AH the external walls are timber-frame J, lathed and plastered on the outside, the plaster being ornamented with the usual large flush panels filled with some roughly icratched pattern. The roofs are steep and covered with tiles and all terminate in plain gables. There is an overhanging upper story on the east side. Some of the windows retain their oak mulhons and transoms. The two old chimneys are groups of plain shafts of bricks 2 in. in thickness. Three

- Image ID: PG0C5F
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG0C5F
. The Victoria history of the county of Hertford. Natural history. A HISTORY OF HERTFORDSHIRE th. :hcn, but the stair itself is very plain. AH the external walls are timber-frame J, lathed and plastered on the outside, the plaster being ornamented with the usual large flush panels filled with some roughly icratched pattern. The roofs are steep and covered with tiles and all terminate in plain gables. There is an overhanging upper story on the east side. Some of the windows retain their oak mulhons and transoms. The two old chimneys are groups of plain shafts of bricks 2 in. in thickness. Three roads branching to the east run into the road to Ardeley, on the east side of which is Walkern Bury, now a modem farm-house. Adjoining it on the south is a small castle ofthe mount and bailey type, thrown up possibly by Hamo de St. Clare in the reign of Stephen.2 Hamo was, we know, an adherent of the turbulent Geoffrey dc Mandeville, and was with him at Stephen's celebrated Easter Court in Bridce In 1403 a commission was granted to John Couper of Walkern, John Matmakcre of Walton, Thoma* Barbour and William Templier of Walkern ' to search for certain treasure of no small amount, which the King understands to be hidd< of Walkern called " Marlepitte. found before the Kin] The nearest railw; Great N<. 1 136. Although the castle stands fairly high, being about 400 ft. above the ordnance datum, it does not seem to have commanded any large extent of country, and would appear to have been built at Walkern as a manorial stronghold, because that was the head of the St. Clare barony in Hertfordshire. It never apparently hid any masonry works, the earthworks being defended by a wooden keep on the mound and limber stockades on the outer defences. The castle was probably destroyed, with numerous other adul- terine or unlicensed castles, in the reign of Henry II. At Clay End a road branches off still further east to Walkern Park, the residence of Mrs. Cotton Browne. Boxbury Farm

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