The treatment of fractures . hand to the finger-tip, and held in position byadhesive-plaster straps, is most useful (see Fig. 343). The splint-wood used should be cut thin and not left thick and bungling—half the thickness of the wood of an ordinary cigar box is aboutright. The splint should be a little narrower than the finger itself.A narrow cotton bandage applied over the finger or a simple cot to 254 FRACTURES OF CARPUS, METACARPUS, AND PHALANGES cover the finger will be comfortable and will assist in immobiliza-tion. Ordinanr letter-paper, by continued folding, may be madeinto a narrow an

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The treatment of fractures . hand to the finger-tip, and held in position byadhesive-plaster straps, is most useful (see Fig. 343). The splint-wood used should be cut thin and not left thick and bungling—half the thickness of the wood of an ordinary cigar box is aboutright. The splint should be a little narrower than the finger itself.A narrow cotton bandage applied over the finger or a simple cot to 254 FRACTURES OF CARPUS, METACARPUS, AND PHALANGES cover the finger will be comfortable and will assist in immobiliza-tion. Ordinanr letter-paper, by continued folding, may be madeinto a narrow an
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Image ID: 2AN2GRE
The treatment of fractures . hand to the finger-tip, and held in position byadhesive-plaster straps, is most useful (see Fig. 343). The splint-wood used should be cut thin and not left thick and bungling—half the thickness of the wood of an ordinary cigar box is aboutright. The splint should be a little narrower than the finger itself.A narrow cotton bandage applied over the finger or a simple cot to 254 FRACTURES OF CARPUS, METACARPUS, AND PHALANGES cover the finger will be comfortable and will assist in immobiliza-tion. Ordinanr letter-paper, by continued folding, may be madeinto a narrow and suitable splint. This is simple and efficient.It should be held in place by a bandage or, preferably, by a cot.Ordinary copper wire may be used, as shown in the illustration,without any padding (see Fig. 344). This serves as a properprotection after the first week or two, and is not so clumsy asother splints. The aluminium or tin finger splint is easily madeand satisfactory (see Fig. 345). Any displacement in this frac-. .—Thumb splint: a, Pattern—measurements are in inches ; d, position of splint. Noteextension of thumb (after Goldthwaite). ture may be easily adjusted by narrow adhesive straps and smallpads. Fractures of the first and second phalanges of the thumb maybe satisfactorily treated after reduction upon a dorsal or lateralsplint of wood, if proper padding is employed (see Figs. 346,347). Frequently, however, the tin splint fitted to the cleftbetween the thumb and forefinger, as shown in the illustration(Fig. 348), will immobilize these fractures more securely andcomfortably. Open Fracture of the Phalanges.— This is usually followedby profuse suppuration from necrosis of the fractured bones.This fracture is to be treated with extreme care, especiallyas regards antisepsis. Immobilization should continue at least OPEN FRACTURE OF THE PHALANGES 255 four weeks. If at the end of this time union has not occurred,the patient may be given the option of continuing th