. The sugar beet : including a history of the beet sugar industry in Europe, varieties of the sugar beet, examination, soils, tillage, seeds and sowing, yield and cost of cultivation, harvesting, transportation, conservation, feeding qualities of the beet and of the pulp, etc. Sugar beet; Sugar beet; Sugar beet industry; Sugar beet industry; Beet sugar; Beet sugar; Beet sugar industry; Beet sugar industry. Seeds placed in lozenges. Circles represent the portion of the soil from which the root draws its nourishment; a is the soil not utilized, and conse- quently lost.. Seeds placed in squares.

- Image ID: RDE2HT
. The sugar beet : including a history of the beet sugar industry in Europe, varieties of the sugar beet, examination, soils, tillage, seeds and sowing, yield and cost of cultivation, harvesting, transportation, conservation, feeding qualities of the beet and of the pulp, etc. Sugar beet; Sugar beet; Sugar beet industry; Sugar beet industry; Beet sugar; Beet sugar; Beet sugar industry; Beet sugar industry. Seeds placed in lozenges. Circles represent the portion of the soil from which the root draws its nourishment; a is the soil not utilized, and conse- quently lost.. Seeds placed in squares.
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDE2HT
. The sugar beet : including a history of the beet sugar industry in Europe, varieties of the sugar beet, examination, soils, tillage, seeds and sowing, yield and cost of cultivation, harvesting, transportation, conservation, feeding qualities of the beet and of the pulp, etc. Sugar beet; Sugar beet; Sugar beet industry; Sugar beet industry; Beet sugar; Beet sugar; Beet sugar industry; Beet sugar industry. Seeds placed in lozenges. Circles represent the portion of the soil from which the root draws its nourishment; a is the soil not utilized, and conse- quently lost.. Seeds placed in squares. Cir- cles and a represent the same as in fig. 32. tracting). The latter is most excellent where weeding oan be done by hand (labor being cheap), but for Amer- ica space is less important than the cost of working the ground. The rectangle (figs. 34 and 35) is preferable, as horses can enter between the rows, facilitating the working of an instrument for weeding. Dr. Peter- mann, of Belgium, has studied this question of dis- tance for years, and we consider him an authority. "We are in hopes it may be of interest to the reader, and for this reason we give the results of several series of his experiments :—. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Ware, Lewis Sharpe, 1851-1918. Philadelphia : Henry Carey Baird & Co.

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