The Stratford gallery; . re! wear this jewel for me ; tis my picture. Refuse it not; it hath no tongue to vex you; And, I beseech you, come again to-morrow. What shall you ask of me that Ill deny— That honor, savd, may upon asking give ? As to her personal charms, Viola addresses her as Most ra-diant, exquisite, and uninatchable beauty, and says of her face: Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and whiteNatures own sweet and cunning hand laid on.*********I see you what yon are : you are too proud;But, if you were the devil, you are fair. Olivia acknowledges to Cesario her fault of unwomanly bold-

- Image ID: 2AJ8YKW
The Stratford gallery; . re! wear this jewel for me ; tis my picture. Refuse it not; it hath no tongue to vex you; And, I beseech you, come again to-morrow. What shall you ask of me that Ill deny— That honor, savd, may upon asking give ? As to her personal charms, Viola addresses her as Most ra-diant, exquisite, and uninatchable beauty, and says of her face: Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and whiteNatures own sweet and cunning hand laid on.*********I see you what yon are : you are too proud;But, if you were the devil, you are fair. Olivia acknowledges to Cesario her fault of unwomanly bold-
The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: 2AJ8YKW
The Stratford gallery; . re! wear this jewel for me ; tis my picture. Refuse it not; it hath no tongue to vex you; And, I beseech you, come again to-morrow. What shall you ask of me that Ill deny— That honor, savd, may upon asking give ? As to her personal charms, Viola addresses her as Most ra-diant, exquisite, and uninatchable beauty, and says of her face: Tis beauty truly blent, whose red and whiteNatures own sweet and cunning hand laid on.*********I see you what yon are : you are too proud;But, if you were the devil, you are fair. Olivia acknowledges to Cesario her fault of unwomanly bold-ness ; but the confession is plainly neither preceded nor followedby even a pretence of penitence; it is but one of the thousandcoquettish tricks of a spoiled beauty to win back the respect whichshe feels she has justly forfeited: I have said too much unto a heart of stone,And laid my honor too unchary out;Theres something in me that reproves my fault;But such a headstrong, potent fault it is,That it but mocks reproof.. ... MARIA. Maria, waiting-woman to the Countess Olivia, is a true typeof the mischief-making heroine of life below-stairs—the stagesonbrette. Arch, coquettish, full of genuine humor, her ready re-sources of fun are liberally diffused throughout this charmingcomedy, with a bewildering succession of ludicrous situations, andmerry mishaps deduced from them. Malvolio, steward of Olivias household, having presumed totake exception to the noisy and not over-nice carousals of SirToby Belch, for whom Maria entertains a saucy sort of prefer-ence, she, to be quits with him—but more, perhaps, for love of apractical jest—resolves to make him ridiculous. This she accom-plishes effectually; but the following groundwork of her plotaffords but an incomplete idea of its laughable consequences: Mar. The devil a Puritan that he is, or any thing con-stantly but a time-pleaser—an affectiond ass, that consstate without book, and utters it by great swarths; thebest persuaded

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