. The story of architecture: an outline of the styles in all countries. forth bridges to either shore.These bridges were many hundred yards in lengthand were bordered with parapets of hydra-headeddragons, supported at intervals by grotesque statues. Scores of domical towers, terminating in tecs,bristled into an eccentric sky line, sculptured allover, and frequently embossed with colossal humanheads, as in the forty-two towers of Angcor-Baion(Plate VII). A long line of loggias usually ran round the ex-terior, belting in an entire collection of temple build-ings, all of which were linked togethe

. The story of architecture: an outline of the styles in all countries. forth bridges to either shore.These bridges were many hundred yards in lengthand were bordered with parapets of hydra-headeddragons, supported at intervals by grotesque statues. Scores of domical towers, terminating in tecs,bristled into an eccentric sky line, sculptured allover, and frequently embossed with colossal humanheads, as in the forty-two towers of Angcor-Baion(Plate VII). A long line of loggias usually ran round the ex-terior, belting in an entire collection of temple build-ings, all of which were linked togethe Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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1307 x 1912 px | 22.1 x 32.4 cm | 8.7 x 12.7 inches | 150dpi

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. The story of architecture: an outline of the styles in all countries. forth bridges to either shore.These bridges were many hundred yards in lengthand were bordered with parapets of hydra-headeddragons, supported at intervals by grotesque statues. Scores of domical towers, terminating in tecs,bristled into an eccentric sky line, sculptured allover, and frequently embossed with colossal humanheads, as in the forty-two towers of Angcor-Baion(Plate VII). A long line of loggias usually ran round the ex-terior, belting in an entire collection of temple build-ings, all of which were linked together by stone pas-sages accentuated at intervals by lions and Laernianmonsters. Windows Avere square, crossbarred with stone,and doors were triumphal arches topped with fan-tastic towers; while piers, tall, lithe, and straight,curved into capitals plumed with petrified leafage,wedding a certain dignity with grace. And yet with all this patient pursuance after effect,the Western mind instinctively balks at accepting somuch elaboration without adequate cause, and it must. JAVANESE ARCHITECTURE. 6r be acknowledged that the multiplicity of spiky towerssuggests a circus where it should suggest a temple,and advertisement rather than magnificence. JAVA. With Brahmanism and Buddhism Javanese archi-tecture began, and with Brahmanism and Buddhismit ended. For after the Moslem invasion in thefifteenth century architecture practically ceased, andlittle or nothing remains save ruins, and they are com-paratively few. These ruins are divided into three principal groupssituated at Gumong Prau, Brabanum, and Boro-Bud-dor, and as monuments of patience may almost becompared to those of Egypt. Boro-Buddor (or Great Buddha) is the most im-portant of the three. It is also the most extraordi-nary building in Java, and, so far as is generallyknown, the most elaborately decorated in the world.Not that this need give it a very high place in archi-tecture, for decoration brings the responsibility ofdistribu