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. The practice of medicine; a text-book for practitioners and students, with special reference to diagnosis and treatment . Fig. iisa.—Tracings of Pulse of Aortic Regurgitation. valve segments, and the blood flows backward into the left ventricle duringdiastole. The ventricle, seeking to restore the balance, redoubles its energyand hypertrophies. The blood is thus driven into th» aorta with greatforce, distending the arteries to an extreme fullness, which, however, fallspromptly away, because of the backward flow into the ventricle at the sametime with the forward movement into arteries and ca

. The practice of medicine; a text-book for practitioners and students, with special reference to diagnosis and treatment . Fig. iisa.—Tracings of Pulse of Aortic Regurgitation. valve segments, and the blood flows backward into the left ventricle duringdiastole. The ventricle, seeking to restore the balance, redoubles its energyand hypertrophies. The blood is thus driven into th» aorta with greatforce, distending the arteries to an extreme fullness, which, however, fallspromptly away, because of the backward flow into the ventricle at the sametime with the forward movement into arteries and ca Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CDB3CT

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7.2 MB (0.2 MB Compressed download)

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2837 x 881 px | 24 x 7.5 cm | 9.5 x 2.9 inches | 300dpi

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. The practice of medicine; a text-book for practitioners and students, with special reference to diagnosis and treatment . Fig. iisa.—Tracings of Pulse of Aortic Regurgitation. valve segments, and the blood flows backward into the left ventricle duringdiastole. The ventricle, seeking to restore the balance, redoubles its energyand hypertrophies. The blood is thus driven into th» aorta with greatforce, distending the arteries to an extreme fullness, which, however, fallspromptly away, because of the backward flow into the ventricle at the sametime with the forward movement into arteries and capillaries. This suddenfalling away of the pulse, from extreme distention to collapse, is verj^ char-acteristic of this form of valviolar disease, and is called the trip-hammeror water-hammer pulse, also Corrigan pulse. To the careful observer itmay even be visible in the exposed arteries, such as the corotid, temporal,and radial, while the aortic beat, ordinarily beyond reach in the suprasternalnotch, may be felt in this situation. The abrupt jerking impulse vnth. sudden recoil is easily recognized bythe finger on