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. The popular natural history . Zoology. THE URSINE HOWLER. In captivity, the Marimonda is a gentle and atfectionate animal, attaching itself strongly to those persons to whom it takes a fancy, and playing many fantastic gambols to attract their attention. Its angry feelings, although per- haps easily roused, do not partake of the petulant malignity which so oftm characterises the monkey race, and are quite free from the rancorous vengeance which is found in the baboons. Very seldom does it attempt to bite, and even when such an event does take place, it is rather the effect of sudden terror t

. The popular natural history . Zoology. THE URSINE HOWLER. In captivity, the Marimonda is a gentle and atfectionate animal, attaching itself strongly to those persons to whom it takes a fancy, and playing many fantastic gambols to attract their attention. Its angry feelings, although per- haps easily roused, do not partake of the petulant malignity which so oftm characterises the monkey race, and are quite free from the rancorous vengeance which is found in the baboons. Very seldom does it attempt to bite, and even when such an event does take place, it is rather the effect of sudden terror t Stock Photo
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Contributor:

The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

RDB88N

File size:

7.1 MB (456.2 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

1734 x 1441 px | 29.4 x 24.4 cm | 11.6 x 9.6 inches | 150dpi

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. The popular natural history . Zoology. THE URSINE HOWLER. In captivity, the Marimonda is a gentle and atfectionate animal, attaching itself strongly to those persons to whom it takes a fancy, and playing many fantastic gambols to attract their attention. Its angry feelings, although per- haps easily roused, do not partake of the petulant malignity which so oftm characterises the monkey race, and are quite free from the rancorous vengeance which is found in the baboons. Very seldom does it attempt to bite, and even when such an event does take place, it is rather the effect of sudden terror than of deliberate malice. On account of its amiable nature it is often brought into a domesticated state, and, if we may give credence to many a traveller, is trained to become not only an amusmg companion, but a useful servant. The colour of this animal varies much, according to the age of the indi- vidual. When adult, the leading colour is of a uniform dull black, devoid of the glossy lustre which throws back the sunbeams from the coaita's furry mantle. On the back, the top of the head, and along the spine, the hair is of a dense, dead black, which seems to have earned for the animal the very inapposite name with which its nomenclators have thought fit to dedecorate the mild and amiable Marimonda. The throat, breast, inside of the limbs, and the under side of the tail are much lighter in tint, while in some individuals a large, bright chestnut patch covers the latter half of the sides. It seems to be of rather a listless character, delighting to bask in the sun's rays, and lying in the strangest attitudes for hours without moving. One of the postures which is most in vogue is achieved by throwing the head back with the eyes turned up, and then flinging the arms over the head. The position in which this animal is depicted in the illustration is a very favourite one with most of the Spider Monkeys. The animal which is here engraved is an example of the celebrated group of Howli

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