The poets' Lincoln - tributes in verse to the martyred President (1915)
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. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. iple or idea it was that kept this Confederacy so longtogether. It was not the mere matter of separation ofthe colonies from the motherland, but that sentimentin the Declaration of Independence which gave liberty,not alone to the people of this country, but hope to allthe world, for all future time. It was that which gavepromise that in due time the weight would be liftedfrom the shoulders of all men and that all should havean equal chance. This is the sentiment embodied inthe Declaration of Independence. Now, my friends, can
RM2AG2GFD. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. iple or idea it was that kept this Confederacy so longtogether. It was not the mere matter of separation ofthe colonies from the motherland, but that sentimentin the Declaration of Independence which gave liberty,not alone to the people of this country, but hope to allthe world, for all future time. It was that which gavepromise that in due time the weight would be liftedfrom the shoulders of all men and that all should havean equal chance. This is the sentiment embodied inthe Declaration of Independence. Now, my friends, can
The poets' Lincoln - tributes in verse to the martyred President (1915)
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The poets' Lincoln - tributes in verse to the martyred President (1915)
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. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. 7 and 1859. Up to that time theSenate Chamber was the present Supreme Court Room,and the Hall of Representatives was the presentNational Statuary Hall. The dome was finished duringthe administration of President Lincoln. The total costof the Capitol building and grounds was about thirtymillion dollars. The remains of President Lincoln wereescorted from the White House to the Capitol at threeoclock P. M., on the 19th of April, 1865. The numberin the procession was estimated at forty thousand, andthat many more were spectators a
RM2AG2G8D. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. 7 and 1859. Up to that time theSenate Chamber was the present Supreme Court Room,and the Hall of Representatives was the presentNational Statuary Hall. The dome was finished duringthe administration of President Lincoln. The total costof the Capitol building and grounds was about thirtymillion dollars. The remains of President Lincoln wereescorted from the White House to the Capitol at threeoclock P. M., on the 19th of April, 1865. The numberin the procession was estimated at forty thousand, andthat many more were spectators a
. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. inced the people that Lincoln measured up to thehigh mental and moral stature demanded of one whowas to be their leader through the most critical periodthat had arisen in the life of the nation. The second inaugural address, coming so shortlybefore the Presidents death, formed unintentionallyhis farewell address. It has the spirit and tone ofprophecy. The Bible, in thought and expression, wasits inspiration. The first two of its three paragraphsring like a chapter from Isaiah, chief of the poet seersof old. The concluding para
RM2AG2PD1. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. inced the people that Lincoln measured up to thehigh mental and moral stature demanded of one whowas to be their leader through the most critical periodthat had arisen in the life of the nation. The second inaugural address, coming so shortlybefore the Presidents death, formed unintentionallyhis farewell address. It has the spirit and tone ofprophecy. The Bible, in thought and expression, wasits inspiration. The first two of its three paragraphsring like a chapter from Isaiah, chief of the poet seersof old. The concluding para
. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. Poets Lincoln TRIBUTES IN VERSE TO THEMARTYRED PRESIDENT Selected by OSBORN H. OLDROYD AUTHOR OF THE ASSASSINATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND EDITOR OF THE WORDS OF LINCOLN With many portraits of Lincoln, illustrations of events in his life, etc. PUBLISHED BY THE EDITOR AT THE HOUSE WHERE LINCOLN DIED WASHINGTON, D. C.1915 Copyright 1915,by Osborn H. Oldroyd ACKNOWLEDGMENT THE Editor is most grateful to the various authors whohave willingly given their consent to the use of theirrespective poems in the compilation of this volume.
RM2AG2R5G. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. Poets Lincoln TRIBUTES IN VERSE TO THEMARTYRED PRESIDENT Selected by OSBORN H. OLDROYD AUTHOR OF THE ASSASSINATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND EDITOR OF THE WORDS OF LINCOLN With many portraits of Lincoln, illustrations of events in his life, etc. PUBLISHED BY THE EDITOR AT THE HOUSE WHERE LINCOLN DIED WASHINGTON, D. C.1915 Copyright 1915,by Osborn H. Oldroyd ACKNOWLEDGMENT THE Editor is most grateful to the various authors whohave willingly given their consent to the use of theirrespective poems in the compilation of this volume.
. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. ;Answered soft, taking counsel of mercy, This man shall not die! Why, he heard from the dungeons, the rice-fields, The dark holds of ships;Every faint, feeble cry which oppression Smothered down on mens lips. THE POETS LINCOLN 213 In her furnace, the centuries hud welded Their fetter and chain;And like withes, in the hands of his purpose, He snapped them in twain. Who can be what he was to the people; What he was to the State?Shall the ages bring to us another As good and as great? Our hearts with their anguish are broken, Our
RM2AG1Y07. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. ;Answered soft, taking counsel of mercy, This man shall not die! Why, he heard from the dungeons, the rice-fields, The dark holds of ships;Every faint, feeble cry which oppression Smothered down on mens lips. THE POETS LINCOLN 213 In her furnace, the centuries hud welded Their fetter and chain;And like withes, in the hands of his purpose, He snapped them in twain. Who can be what he was to the people; What he was to the State?Shall the ages bring to us another As good and as great? Our hearts with their anguish are broken, Our
. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. l Memories and Other Poems,and a volume of Buffalo verse collected by him under thetitle of Poets and Poetry of Buffalo. He assisted incollections of Buffalo local literature, also devotedmuch time to the production of publications of a phil-anthropic nature. REQUIEM BEAR him to his Western home,Whence he came four years ago;Not beneath some Eastern dome,But where Freedoms airs may come,Where the prairie grasses grow,To the friends who loved him so, Take him to his quiet rest; Toll the bell and fire the gun;He who served his C
RM2AG23FG. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. l Memories and Other Poems,and a volume of Buffalo verse collected by him under thetitle of Poets and Poetry of Buffalo. He assisted incollections of Buffalo local literature, also devotedmuch time to the production of publications of a phil-anthropic nature. REQUIEM BEAR him to his Western home,Whence he came four years ago;Not beneath some Eastern dome,But where Freedoms airs may come,Where the prairie grasses grow,To the friends who loved him so, Take him to his quiet rest; Toll the bell and fire the gun;He who served his C
. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. town roaring near. When the mountain stream from its idle playWas caught by the mill-wheel, and borne awayAnd trained to labor, the gray rock mused:Tree and verdure and stream are usedBy man, the master, but I remainFriend of the Mountain, and Star, and Plain;Unchanged forever, by Gods decree,While passing centuries bow to me! Then, all unwarned, with a heavy shock Down from the mountain was wrenched the rock. Bruised and battered and broken in heart, He was carried away to a common mart. Wrecked and ruined in peace and pride,
RM2AG1PYX. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. town roaring near. When the mountain stream from its idle playWas caught by the mill-wheel, and borne awayAnd trained to labor, the gray rock mused:Tree and verdure and stream are usedBy man, the master, but I remainFriend of the Mountain, and Star, and Plain;Unchanged forever, by Gods decree,While passing centuries bow to me! Then, all unwarned, with a heavy shock Down from the mountain was wrenched the rock. Bruised and battered and broken in heart, He was carried away to a common mart. Wrecked and ruined in peace and pride,
. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. life of a country boy, going to schoolsix months in the year till he was fourteen, after whichhe had to work on the farm in summer. His books hadmore interest to him than his work, and he managedto learn more out of school than in it. At sixteen hewrote articles in verse and prose for magazines andjournals. He was a contributor to the Atlantic Monthly.During the great rebellion, he wrote several storiesof the war: The Drummer Boy, 1863, and The ThreeScouts, 1865. On the return of peace he spent somefour months in the principal
RM2AG1W5Y. The poets' Lincoln : tributes in verse to the martyred President. life of a country boy, going to schoolsix months in the year till he was fourteen, after whichhe had to work on the farm in summer. His books hadmore interest to him than his work, and he managedto learn more out of school than in it. At sixteen hewrote articles in verse and prose for magazines andjournals. He was a contributor to the Atlantic Monthly.During the great rebellion, he wrote several storiesof the war: The Drummer Boy, 1863, and The ThreeScouts, 1865. On the return of peace he spent somefour months in the principal