. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 18 HISTORY OF FARM small and seedy kinds, that have been hardy enough to hold their own, in spite of mowing and grazing and clearing. They compare poorly with the selected and cultivated prod- ucts of the fruit farm. Yet many of them once served oiir ancestors for food. Collectively they were the sole fruit supply of the aboriginal inhabitants of our country. The Indians ate them raw, stewed them, made jam, and even jellies. They dried the wild strawberries, blueberri
RMRDEFJ0. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 18 HISTORY OF FARM small and seedy kinds, that have been hardy enough to hold their own, in spite of mowing and grazing and clearing. They compare poorly with the selected and cultivated prod- ucts of the fruit farm. Yet many of them once served oiir ancestors for food. Collectively they were the sole fruit supply of the aboriginal inhabitants of our country. The Indians ate them raw, stewed them, made jam, and even jellies. They dried the wild strawberries, blueberri
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 72 HISTORY OF FARM. The trees have not changed, but our relations with them have become remote. Let us renew acquaintance with a few at least of those that are native to otir soil. Let us go out and stand among them, and feel, as our ancestors felt, their vigor, their majestic stature and their venerable age. To the ancients they stood as symbols of strength, of longevity, and of peace. Our poets love to celebrate the grace of the birch, the beauty of the beech, the l
RMPG44WB. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 72 HISTORY OF FARM. The trees have not changed, but our relations with them have become remote. Let us renew acquaintance with a few at least of those that are native to otir soil. Let us go out and stand among them, and feel, as our ancestors felt, their vigor, their majestic stature and their venerable age. To the ancients they stood as symbols of strength, of longevity, and of peace. Our poets love to celebrate the grace of the birch, the beauty of the beech, the l
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 72 HISTORY OF FARM. The trees have not changed, but our relations with them have become remote. Let us renew acquaintance with a few at least of those that are native to otir soil. Let us go out and stand among them, and feel, as our ancestors felt, their vigor, their majestic stature and their venerable age. To the ancients they stood as symbols of strength, of longevity, and of peace. Our poets love to celebrate the grace of the birch, the beauty of the beech, the l
RMRDE26Y. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 72 HISTORY OF FARM. The trees have not changed, but our relations with them have become remote. Let us renew acquaintance with a few at least of those that are native to otir soil. Let us go out and stand among them, and feel, as our ancestors felt, their vigor, their majestic stature and their venerable age. To the ancients they stood as symbols of strength, of longevity, and of peace. Our poets love to celebrate the grace of the birch, the beauty of the beech, the l
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 48 HISTORY OP FARM. Fig. 28. The pike. other dwellers in the stream are restricted to the shoals and to the shelter of rocks or of vegetation. Certain of them like- the pike (fig. 28) are specialized for feeding at the surface: others, like the sucker (fig. 29), for feeding at the bottom, and the mcflith is turned up or down accordingly. The best of them are carnivorous and eat habitually other smaller fishes. The rock bass seems to prefer crawfishes as food. Most of
RMPG44Y7. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 48 HISTORY OP FARM. Fig. 28. The pike. other dwellers in the stream are restricted to the shoals and to the shelter of rocks or of vegetation. Certain of them like- the pike (fig. 28) are specialized for feeding at the surface: others, like the sucker (fig. 29), for feeding at the bottom, and the mcflith is turned up or down accordingly. The best of them are carnivorous and eat habitually other smaller fishes. The rock bass seems to prefer crawfishes as food. Most of
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 48 HISTORY OP FARM. Fig. 28. The pike. other dwellers in the stream are restricted to the shoals and to the shelter of rocks or of vegetation. Certain of them like- the pike (fig. 28) are specialized for feeding at the surface: others, like the sucker (fig. 29), for feeding at the bottom, and the mcflith is turned up or down accordingly. The best of them are carnivorous and eat habitually other smaller fishes. The rock bass seems to prefer crawfishes as food. Most of
RMRDE29H. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 48 HISTORY OP FARM. Fig. 28. The pike. other dwellers in the stream are restricted to the shoals and to the shelter of rocks or of vegetation. Certain of them like- the pike (fig. 28) are specialized for feeding at the surface: others, like the sucker (fig. 29), for feeding at the bottom, and the mcflith is turned up or down accordingly. The best of them are carnivorous and eat habitually other smaller fishes. The rock bass seems to prefer crawfishes as food. Most of
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 18 HISTORY OF FARM small and seedy kinds, that have been hardy enough to hold their own, in spite of mowing and grazing and clearing. They compare poorly with the selected and cultivated prod- ucts of the fruit farm. Yet many of them once served oiir ancestors for food. Collectively they were the sole fruit supply of the aboriginal inhabitants of our country. The Indians ate them raw, stewed them, made jam, and even jellies. They dried the wild strawberries, blueberri
RMPG453B. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 18 HISTORY OF FARM small and seedy kinds, that have been hardy enough to hold their own, in spite of mowing and grazing and clearing. They compare poorly with the selected and cultivated prod- ucts of the fruit farm. Yet many of them once served oiir ancestors for food. Collectively they were the sole fruit supply of the aboriginal inhabitants of our country. The Indians ate them raw, stewed them, made jam, and even jellies. They dried the wild strawberries, blueberri
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 42 HISTORY OF FARM eqtiipped for fighting, cannot afford to be conspicuous. But if one-will reflect that carnivores raay not maintain themselves indefinitely by eating one another, and will look a little more closely, he will find plenty of the herbivorous forms. These are they whose economic fimction is that of "turning grass into flesh, in order that carnivorous Goths and Vandals may subsist also, and in their turn .pro- claim 'All flesh is grass' " (Coues
RMRDE2AW. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 42 HISTORY OF FARM eqtiipped for fighting, cannot afford to be conspicuous. But if one-will reflect that carnivores raay not maintain themselves indefinitely by eating one another, and will look a little more closely, he will find plenty of the herbivorous forms. These are they whose economic fimction is that of "turning grass into flesh, in order that carnivorous Goths and Vandals may subsist also, and in their turn .pro- claim 'All flesh is grass' " (Coues
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 6o HISTORY OF FARM. Fig. 33. The poison hem- lock: portions of flower cluster, leaf and root. inedible, and a few like the water hemlock (Fig. 33) are very poison- ous. All the cultivated sorts, radishes, beets, turnips, carrots, parsnips, chicory, etc., are natives of the old world. The last named, where cultivated, is chiefly used to make an adulterant for coffee, and has scarcely any nutritive value. American tubers are much more valuable. Indeed, the most valuable
RMPG44X8. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 6o HISTORY OF FARM. Fig. 33. The poison hem- lock: portions of flower cluster, leaf and root. inedible, and a few like the water hemlock (Fig. 33) are very poison- ous. All the cultivated sorts, radishes, beets, turnips, carrots, parsnips, chicory, etc., are natives of the old world. The last named, where cultivated, is chiefly used to make an adulterant for coffee, and has scarcely any nutritive value. American tubers are much more valuable. Indeed, the most valuable
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 6o HISTORY OF FARM. Fig. 33. The poison hem- lock: portions of flower cluster, leaf and root. inedible, and a few like the water hemlock (Fig. 33) are very poison- ous. All the cultivated sorts, radishes, beets, turnips, carrots, parsnips, chicory, etc., are natives of the old world. The last named, where cultivated, is chiefly used to make an adulterant for coffee, and has scarcely any nutritive value. American tubers are much more valuable. Indeed, the most valuable
RMRDE284. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 6o HISTORY OF FARM. Fig. 33. The poison hem- lock: portions of flower cluster, leaf and root. inedible, and a few like the water hemlock (Fig. 33) are very poison- ous. All the cultivated sorts, radishes, beets, turnips, carrots, parsnips, chicory, etc., are natives of the old world. The last named, where cultivated, is chiefly used to make an adulterant for coffee, and has scarcely any nutritive value. American tubers are much more valuable. Indeed, the most valuable
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 34 HISTORY OF FARM. THE PLANT LIFE OF THE STREAM The rapids are by no means destitute of life. Given natural waters, a tem- perature above freezing, light and air, plants will grow any- where: here, they must be such plants as can withstand the shower o f stones that every flood brings down upon them. They must be simply organized plants, that are not killed when their cell masses are broken asimder. Such plants are the algae: and these abound in the swiftest waters.
RMPG451P. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 34 HISTORY OF FARM. THE PLANT LIFE OF THE STREAM The rapids are by no means destitute of life. Given natural waters, a tem- perature above freezing, light and air, plants will grow any- where: here, they must be such plants as can withstand the shower o f stones that every flood brings down upon them. They must be simply organized plants, that are not killed when their cell masses are broken asimder. Such plants are the algae: and these abound in the swiftest waters.
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 54 HISTORY OF FARM stems of the grass asunder. If broken, take up the pieces and' observe that each is provided with its own roots. Thus, a moderate amount of trampling only serves to push the grasses into new territory. Think, how disastrous in comparison would be the descent of this bovine's hoofs upon the balsams and cabbages of the garden. So, the chief perils to plants in the pasture are of three sorts. The danger of death from being eaten, from being pulled up a
RMRDE293. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 54 HISTORY OF FARM stems of the grass asunder. If broken, take up the pieces and' observe that each is provided with its own roots. Thus, a moderate amount of trampling only serves to push the grasses into new territory. Think, how disastrous in comparison would be the descent of this bovine's hoofs upon the balsams and cabbages of the garden. So, the chief perils to plants in the pasture are of three sorts. The danger of death from being eaten, from being pulled up a
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 54 HISTORY OF FARM stems of the grass asunder. If broken, take up the pieces and' observe that each is provided with its own roots. Thus, a moderate amount of trampling only serves to push the grasses into new territory. Think, how disastrous in comparison would be the descent of this bovine's hoofs upon the balsams and cabbages of the garden. So, the chief perils to plants in the pasture are of three sorts. The danger of death from being eaten, from being pulled up a
RMPG44XT. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 54 HISTORY OF FARM stems of the grass asunder. If broken, take up the pieces and' observe that each is provided with its own roots. Thus, a moderate amount of trampling only serves to push the grasses into new territory. Think, how disastrous in comparison would be the descent of this bovine's hoofs upon the balsams and cabbages of the garden. So, the chief perils to plants in the pasture are of three sorts. The danger of death from being eaten, from being pulled up a
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 98 HISTORY OF FARM Besides the bison, "noblest of American quadrupeds" there were deer and elk and moose, of wide distribution, and in the Rockies were mountain sheep and goat: and in their foot- hills, the graceful prong-horn. Of these, the red deer remains where given protection: indeed, though never domesticated, it seems to thrive on the borders of civilization. Recently in New Eng- land farmers have had to kill off wild deer in order to save their crops
RMRDE25F. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 98 HISTORY OF FARM Besides the bison, "noblest of American quadrupeds" there were deer and elk and moose, of wide distribution, and in the Rockies were mountain sheep and goat: and in their foot- hills, the graceful prong-horn. Of these, the red deer remains where given protection: indeed, though never domesticated, it seems to thrive on the borders of civilization. Recently in New Eng- land farmers have had to kill off wild deer in order to save their crops