. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 72 HISTORY OF FARM. The trees have not changed, but our relations with them have become remote. Let us renew acquaintance with a few at least of those that are native to otir soil. Let us go out and stand among them, and feel, as our ancestors felt, their vigor, their majestic stature and their venerable age. To the ancients they stood as symbols of strength, of longevity, and of peace. Our poets love to celebrate the grace of the birch, the beauty of the beech, the l

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. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 72 HISTORY OF FARM. The trees have not changed, but our relations with them have become remote. Let us renew acquaintance with a few at least of those that are native to otir soil. Let us go out and stand among them, and feel, as our ancestors felt, their vigor, their majestic stature and their venerable age. To the ancients they stood as symbols of strength, of longevity, and of peace. Our poets love to celebrate the grace of the birch, the beauty of the beech, the lofty bearing of the pine and the rugged strength of the oak. In winter, when the boughs are bare and stand out sharply against the background of the sky, the structural character- istics that best distin- gtiish tree species are most readily seen. The forking and the taper and the grouping of the branches, the size and stoutness and position of the twigs, that are obscured by stimmer foliage are now evident. By noting such characters as these we may learn to recognize the trees. The woodsman, who learns them unconsciously, knows them as wholes, and knows them without analysis by the complex of characters they present. But most of us will have to make their acquaintance by careful comparison of their characters separately. A few suggestions to that end here follow. There are a few deciduous trees that are instantly recogniz- able in winter by their color. Such are the white birch and the sycamore. The former is pure white on the trunk and larger branches: the latter is flecked with greenish white on the boughs, where the outer bark is shed in patches. The light satiny gray of the smooth beech trunks, and the mat gray of the rough white oak trunks, also help, although less ^IG. 40. Diagram illustrating the characteristics of form in some common trees; a. Lombardy poplar; b, white birch; c, sugar maple; d, apple; c, American elm.. Please note that these images are extracted from s

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