. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 62 HISTORY OP FARM Fig. i6b): its charmed product, "calamus root." Dried it is often nibbled by school children, and it is candied by their mothers, especially in New England, and served as a condi- ment. There are a number of other native "roots" of semi-aquatic plants that were eaten by the aborigines. The biggest "root" of all was the rhizome of the spatterdock—several feet long and often six inches thick, coarse and spongy, and full o

- Image ID: RDE27E
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 62 HISTORY OP FARM Fig. i6b): its charmed product, "calamus root." Dried it is often nibbled by school children, and it is candied by their mothers, especially in New England, and served as a condi- ment. There are a number of other native "roots" of semi-aquatic plants that were eaten by the aborigines. The biggest "root" of all was the rhizome of the spatterdock—several feet long and often six inches thick, coarse and spongy, and full o
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Image ID: RDE27E
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 62 HISTORY OP FARM Fig. i6b): its charmed product, "calamus root." Dried it is often nibbled by school children, and it is candied by their mothers, especially in New England, and served as a condi- ment. There are a number of other native "roots" of semi-aquatic plants that were eaten by the aborigines. The biggest "root" of all was the rhizome of the spatterdock—several feet long and often six inches thick, coarse and spongy, and full of starch. The root stock of the lotus, and of several other members of the water lily family are edible: also, the sub- terranean offsets of the cat-tail. These were and are favorite foods of the muskrat, also. The red man ate also the root stocks of the arrowhead and the underground stems of the false Solomon's seal. Then if we count the exotic, cultivated peanut in its pod a root crop, we shall have to count the native hogpeanut (AmphicorpaamonoicaFig. ^6) with its more fleshy and root- like subterranean pod, one also. It is a most interesting plant. It grows as a slender twining vine on low bushes in the edge of thickets. It produces pale blue flowers in racemes along the upper part of the stem, and from these develop small, bean-like pods. It develops also scattered, colorless, self-fertilizing flowers on short branches at the surface of the soil. These are very fertile. They push into the soil and develop there mostly one-seeded, roundish, fleshy pods about half an inch in diameter. These are the hog-peanuts.. Fig. 35. A portion of a vine of the hog peanut (Amphicarpiea), bearing both flowers and seed pods.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Needham, James G. (James George), 1868-1956. I

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