. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 54 HISTORY OF FARM stems of the grass asunder. If broken, take up the pieces and' observe that each is provided with its own roots. Thus, a moderate amount of trampling only serves to push the grasses into new territory. Think, how disastrous in comparison would be the descent of this bovine's hoofs upon the balsams and cabbages of the garden. So, the chief perils to plants in the pasture are of three sorts. The danger of death from being eaten, from being pulled up a

- Image ID: PG44XT
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG44XT
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 54 HISTORY OF FARM stems of the grass asunder. If broken, take up the pieces and' observe that each is provided with its own roots. Thus, a moderate amount of trampling only serves to push the grasses into new territory. Think, how disastrous in comparison would be the descent of this bovine's hoofs upon the balsams and cabbages of the garden. So, the chief perils to plants in the pasture are of three sorts. The danger of death from being eaten, from being pulled up and from being trampled. To be sure, both browsing and trampling may easily be overdone, and the hardi- est of plants may be exterminated. This occurs in the places where the herds habitually stand in the shade of trees. Furthermore, mere hardiness will not qualify a plant to be a good member of the pasture society. The first requisite of all is that it shall be palatable and nutritious. The little wire rush (Fig. 30) is among the hardiest of pasture plants, growing habitually in the very edges of the path, but it is well nigh worthless as forage. The most valuable plants for permanent pastures are all grasses. Indeed, the very best of them are native grasses that exist today just as they came to us from the hand of nature. The only selection that has been practiced on them is the natural selection that through long ages has eliminated such sorts as are not equipped to meet the requirements set.. Fig. 30. The wire rush (Juncus tenuis).. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Needham, James G. (James George), 1868-1956. Ithaca, N. Y. , The Comstock Publishing Company

Similar stock images