. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 114 HISTORY OF FARM leagues distant from here on the brink of the river (the Seneca) are eight or ten fine salt fountains in a small space. It is there that nets are spread for pigeons, and from seven to eight hundred are often taken at a single stroke of the net. Lake Tiohero (Cayuga), one of the two which joins our can- ton, is fully fourteen leagues long and one or two broad. It aboimds in swans and geese all winter, and in spring one sees a continuous cloud of all

- Image ID: RDE24Y
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 114 HISTORY OF FARM leagues distant from here on the brink of the river (the Seneca) are eight or ten fine salt fountains in a small space. It is there that nets are spread for pigeons, and from seven to eight hundred are often taken at a single stroke of the net. Lake Tiohero (Cayuga), one of the two which joins our can- ton, is fully fourteen leagues long and one or two broad. It aboimds in swans and geese all winter, and in spring one sees a continuous cloud of all
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDE24Y
. The natural history of the farm; a guide to the practical study of the sources of our living in wild nature. Natural history. 114 HISTORY OF FARM leagues distant from here on the brink of the river (the Seneca) are eight or ten fine salt fountains in a small space. It is there that nets are spread for pigeons, and from seven to eight hundred are often taken at a single stroke of the net. Lake Tiohero (Cayuga), one of the two which joins our can- ton, is fully fourteen leagues long and one or two broad. It aboimds in swans and geese all winter, and in spring one sees a continuous cloud of all sorts of game. Tie river which rises in the lake soon divides into different channels enclosed by prairies, with here and there fine attractive bays of con- siderable extent, excellent places for hunting." {Jesuit Relations for 16.71-72). Of our fine native fowl, one, the turkey, has been domesticated: one, the wild pigeon has been wholly exter- noinated; and most of the others have been hunted almost to the point of extinction: game laws as at present written serve merely to prolong a little their slaughter. If there be any hope of preserving unto future gener- ations the remnant of those game birds that still survive it would seem to lie in the permanent reservations that are being established north and south, mainly by private enterprise. The wild pigeon was the .first of our fine game birds to disappear. Its social habits were its madoiog. when once guns were brought to its pursuit. It flew in great flocks which were conspicuous and noisy, and whidi the htmter could follow by eye and ear, The wild passenger ^jj^ mow dowii With shot at every. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Needham, James G. (James George), 1868-1956. Ithaca, N. Y. , The Comstock Publishing Company

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