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. The natural enemies of birds. Birds. 44 ^ The young are grayish olive, with short livid black blotches or spots. This is the common black snake of New England, and is found mainly in regions more or less wooded. Accord- ing to Professor Surface it feeds to some extent on large insects, but more on other insectivorous creatures, such as small snakes, frogs and birds, but it is believed to be a destroyer of the rattlesnake and the copperhead. The following diagram gives an idea of its food. It is not a creature for the bird protection- ist to protect. Next to the black snake, the house, milk o

. The natural enemies of birds. Birds. 44 ^ The young are grayish olive, with short livid black blotches or spots. This is the common black snake of New England, and is found mainly in regions more or less wooded. Accord- ing to Professor Surface it feeds to some extent on large insects, but more on other insectivorous creatures, such as small snakes, frogs and birds, but it is believed to be a destroyer of the rattlesnake and the copperhead. The following diagram gives an idea of its food. It is not a creature for the bird protection- ist to protect. Next to the black snake, the house, milk o Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RDADKF

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7.2 MB (240.7 KB Compressed download)

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1583 x 1579 px | 26.8 x 26.7 cm | 10.6 x 10.5 inches | 150dpi

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. The natural enemies of birds. Birds. 44 ^ The young are grayish olive, with short livid black blotches or spots. This is the common black snake of New England, and is found mainly in regions more or less wooded. Accord- ing to Professor Surface it feeds to some extent on large insects, but more on other insectivorous creatures, such as small snakes, frogs and birds, but it is believed to be a destroyer of the rattlesnake and the copperhead. The following diagram gives an idea of its food. It is not a creature for the bird protection- ist to protect. Next to the black snake, the house, milk or chicken snake. Diagram showing the percentages of food items of milk or house snake (Lampropeltis doliatus triangulus) for the year: 48H per cent field mice (Microtus pennsylvanicua); 20 per cent undetermined mice; 11 per cent unidentified mammals; 6 per cent snakes; 5H per cent birds; 3 per cent slugs; 3 per cent jumping mice; 3 per cent undetermined vertebrates. (After Surface.) (Lampropeltis doliatus triangulus), sometimes called in Massa- chusetts the spotted or checkered adder, is believed to be most destructive to birds. This is a rather slim, active serpent and may be distinguished from the other species by a series of small square or rectangular black blotches on its light under parts. It is so active and so proficient in climbing that it can go almost anywhere that it is possible for a snake to go. Mrs. Touissant describes how she saw a snake, apparently of this species, climb up the side of a building, hook its chin over the. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Forbush, Edward Howe, 1858-1929; Massachusetts. State Board of Agriculture. Boston, Wright and Potter Printing Co. , state printers

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