The literary digest . (Houghton Mifflin Company,Boston): TO A POET A THOUSAND YEARSHENCE By James Elroy Flecker I who am dead a thousand years And wrote this sweet archaic song,Send you my words for messengersThe way I shall not pass along. I care not if you bridge the seas. Or ride seciu-e the cruel sky.Or build consummate palaces Of metal or of masonry. But have you wine and music still,.d statues and a bright-eyed love. And foolish thoughts of good and ill,And prayers to them who sit above? How shall we conquer? Like a windThat falls at eve our fancies blow. And old Maeonidcs the blind Said

The literary digest . (Houghton Mifflin Company,Boston): TO A POET A THOUSAND YEARSHENCE By James Elroy Flecker I who am dead a thousand years And wrote this sweet archaic song,Send you my words for messengersThe way I shall not pass along. I care not if you bridge the seas. Or ride seciu-e the cruel sky.Or build consummate palaces Of metal or of masonry. But have you wine and music still,.d statues and a bright-eyed love. And foolish thoughts of good and ill,And prayers to them who sit above? How shall we conquer? Like a windThat falls at eve our fancies blow. And old Maeonidcs the blind Said Stock Photo
Preview

Image details

Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AJE2YG

File size:

7.1 MB (354.1 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

1586 x 1575 px | 26.9 x 26.7 cm | 10.6 x 10.5 inches | 150dpi

More information:

This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

The literary digest . (Houghton Mifflin Company,Boston): TO A POET A THOUSAND YEARSHENCE By James Elroy Flecker I who am dead a thousand years And wrote this sweet archaic song,Send you my words for messengersThe way I shall not pass along. I care not if you bridge the seas. Or ride seciu-e the cruel sky.Or build consummate palaces Of metal or of masonry. But have you wine and music still,.d statues and a bright-eyed love. And foolish thoughts of good and ill,And prayers to them who sit above? How shall we conquer? Like a windThat falls at eve our fancies blow. And old Maeonidcs the blind Said it three thousand years ago. Oh, friend, un.seen, unborn, unknown.Student of our sweet Eni;lish tongue. Read out my words at night alone:I was a poet, I wiis young. Since I can never see your face.And never .shake you by the hand, I send my soul through time and spaceTo greet you. You will understand. In sharp contrast to the melancholystrain of the foregoing we have a lyric-protest against the too common and most. You should remember Heinz Baked Beans notmerely when buying beans, but when buying anyfood because Heinz Oven Baked Beans are not onlythe most delicious form of beans, but because theyare an acceptable substitute for many foods that costmuch more, and have less food value—an importantconsideration in these days of high living costs. To get baked beans at their best insist on HeinzBaked Beans, because Heinz Baked Beans are reallybaked—baked in ovens with dry heat. They havethat delicious and unmistakable flavor which thebaking gives, and they are seasoned with skill andcare. They are flavored with pork or tomato sauce,or both. Four different styles, all equally good. •5 i Heinz57 Varieties Your grocer carries Heinzproducts. Did you ever stepinto a grocery store where the57 were not sold? Why do you suppose everygrocer has the 57? Popularity didnt make themgood—but making the 57 goodmade them popular so that everygood grocer keeps his shelveswell supplied for

Save up to 30% with our image packs

Pre-pay for multiple images and download on demand.

View discounts