The library of historic characters and famous events of all nations and all ages; . ityprevailed over the most distinguished and the ablest generals.On the other hand, the magnanimity of Sertorius appearedin every step he took. The patricians, who had been obligedto fly from Rome, and take refuge with him, he called a Senate.Out of them he appointed quaestors and lieutenants, and ineverything proceeded according to the laws of his country.What was of still greater moment, though he made war withonly the arms, the money and the men of Spain, he did notsuffer the Spaniards to have the least shar

- Image ID: 2AJGP47
The library of historic characters and famous events of all nations and all ages; . ityprevailed over the most distinguished and the ablest generals.On the other hand, the magnanimity of Sertorius appearedin every step he took. The patricians, who had been obligedto fly from Rome, and take refuge with him, he called a Senate.Out of them he appointed quaestors and lieutenants, and ineverything proceeded according to the laws of his country.What was of still greater moment, though he made war withonly the arms, the money and the men of Spain, he did notsuffer the Spaniards to have the least shar
The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: 2AJGP47
The library of historic characters and famous events of all nations and all ages; . ityprevailed over the most distinguished and the ablest generals.On the other hand, the magnanimity of Sertorius appearedin every step he took. The patricians, who had been obligedto fly from Rome, and take refuge with him, he called a Senate.Out of them he appointed quaestors and lieutenants, and ineverything proceeded according to the laws of his country.What was of still greater moment, though he made war withonly the arms, the money and the men of Spain, he did notsuffer the Spaniards to have the least share in any departmentof government, even in words or titles. He gave them Romangenerals and governors, to make it appear that the liberty ofRome was his great object, and that he did not want to set upthe Spaniards against the Romans. In fact, he was a truelover of his country, and his passion to be restored to it wasone of the first in his heart. He said he had rather be themeanest citizen in Rome, than an exile with the command ofall the other countries in the world.—Plutarch..