. The language of flowers: or, Floral emblems of thoughts, feelings, and sentiments ... Flower language. INTRODUCTORY PREFACE. Before the different languages which are now common among men were developed, various animate and inanimate objects were made use of instead of words, for the purpose of giving expression to thoughts. Animals, birds, and flowe*rs were emblems of individuals and their characteristics; and though sometimes erroneously assigned, they are yet very generally adopted. Lions and foxes, eagles and hawks, and an almost endless number of quadrupeds and fowls of the air, have bee

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. The language of flowers: or, Floral emblems of thoughts, feelings, and sentiments ... Flower language. INTRODUCTORY PREFACE. Before the different languages which are now common among men were developed, various animate and inanimate objects were made use of instead of words, for the purpose of giving expression to thoughts. Animals, birds, and flowe*rs were emblems of individuals and their characteristics; and though sometimes erroneously assigned, they are yet very generally adopted. Lions and foxes, eagles and hawks, and an almost endless number of quadrupeds and fowls of the air, have bee Stock Photo
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. The language of flowers: or, Floral emblems of thoughts, feelings, and sentiments ... Flower language. INTRODUCTORY PREFACE. Before the different languages which are now common among men were developed, various animate and inanimate objects were made use of instead of words, for the purpose of giving expression to thoughts. Animals, birds, and flowe*rs were emblems of individuals and their characteristics; and though sometimes erroneously assigned, they are yet very generally adopted. Lions and foxes, eagles and hawks, and an almost endless number of quadrupeds and fowls of the air, have bee
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. The language of flowers: or, Floral emblems of thoughts, feelings, and sentiments ... Flower language. INTRODUCTORY PREFACE. Before the different languages which are now common among men were developed, various animate and inanimate objects were made use of instead of words, for the purpose of giving expression to thoughts. Animals, birds, and flowe*rs were emblems of individuals and their characteristics; and though sometimes erroneously assigned, they are yet very generally adopted. Lions and foxes, eagles and hawks, and an almost endless number of quadrupeds and fowls of the air, have been thus applied and are still; yet, since most of us are little familiar with beasts and birds of prey, in these days of high civiliza- tion, it is natural that we should make choice of objects which are mixed up with our daily life, when we desire to give expression to our opinions or feelings by means of symbols rather than words. In the vegetable kingdom we find objects most suitable for this purpose. We live in the midst of trees, and flowering. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Tyas, Robert, 1811-1879. London, New York, G. Routledge and sons