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The kidnapping of Louis Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Enghien (duc d'Enghien) on the orders of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1804

The kidnapping of Louis Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Enghien (duc d'Enghien) on the orders of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1804 Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Historical Images Archive / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

M92WHG

File size:

22 MB (2.9 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

3225 x 2389 px | 27.3 x 20.2 cm | 10.8 x 8 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

21 March 2018

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Illustration from a history of England published in 1906. Info from wiki: Louis Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Enghien, duc d'Enghien, 1772–1804),executed on charges of aiding Britain and plotting against France. Royalty across Europe were shocked and dismayed at his execution. Tsar Alexander I of Russia was especially alarmed, and decided to curb Napoleon's power Early in 1804, Napoleon Bonaparte, then First Consul of France, heard news which seemed to connect the young duke with the Cadoudal Affair, a conspiracy which was being tracked by the French police at the time. It involved royalists Jean-Charles Pichegru and Georges Cadoudal who wished to overthrow Bonaparte's regime and reinstate the monarchy.[4] The news ran that the duke was in company with Charles François Dumouriez and had made secret journeys into France. This was false; the duke had no dealings with either Cadoudal or Pichegru. However, the duke had previously been condemned in absentia for having fought against the French Republic in the Armée des Émigrés. Napoleon gave orders for the seizure of the duke. French dragoons crossed the Rhine secretly, surrounded his house and brought him to Strasbourg (15 March 1804), and thence to the Château de Vincennes, near Paris, where a military commission of French colonels presided over by General Hulin was hastily convened to try him. The military commission, presided over by Hulin, drew up the act of condemnation, being incited thereto by orders from Anne Jean Marie René Savary, who had come charged with instructions to kill the duke. Savary prevented any chance of an interview between the condemned and the First Consul, and, on 21 March, the duke was shot in the moat of the castle, near a grave which had already been prepared. A platoon of the Gendarmes d'élite was in charge of the execution.

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